TAH – Blog Post 13 – John D Rockefeller and a Fortune of Deceit

DISCLAIMER

The following article was written to showcase the common mainstream view of John D Rockefeller. As usual, I use a “Devil’s Advocate” approach to illustrate how we are LIED to and how the manipulation of our history and our human origins has been hidden from us for FAR too long! I will pepper this article with my own biases because, why the fuck not? We have ALL been lied to and it’s damn time we turn the tables on the 1% globalist elite that have kept up this game of deceit for way too fucking long!

1 – Who was John D Rockefeller?

John D. Rockefeller, the famous American oil tycoon, was not just known for his wealth, but also for his philanthropic activities. One of his major contributions to society was in the field of education. Rockefeller, through his foundation, played a significant role in shaping the American education system, which still has an impact on education today.

John D. Rockefeller was born in 1839 in New York. He was the founder of the Standard Oil Company, which became the largest oil company in the world in the late 19th century. Rockefeller was known for his business acumen and his ability to create wealth. However, he was also a philanthropist who believed in giving back to society. Rockefeller believed that education (ie indoctrination and mass psychological manipulation) was the key to progress and development. He believed that a well-educated (ie well indoctrinated) society was essential for the growth and prosperity of any nation (ie ONLY Capitalist nations).

2 – Home of Instability

John D. Rockefeller, Sr. is widely recognized as one of the wealthiest men in American history, but his success did not come without its fair share of turbulence. Born on July 8, 1839, in Richford, New York, John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. was the second-born child of William Avery Rockefeller and Eliza Davison. William, John’s father, was a traveling salesman and a notorious bigamist who had two wives and several children with each. This background set the stage for a tumultuous relationship between father and son that would shape John’s life and legacy.

As a young boy, John faced many challenges due to his family’s financial instability. His father’s philandering and financial irresponsibility forced the family to move frequently, and the young John was often pulled out of school to help support the family. Despite these challenges, John was a gifted student who excelled in his studies and displayed a keen business acumen from a young age.

When John was just 14 years old, his father abandoned the family, leaving them to fend for themselves. This event marked a turning point in John’s life and forced him to become the man of the house and take on an even greater role in supporting his family. John’s mother, Eliza, was a devoutly religious woman who instilled in her children a strong sense of duty and work ethic. These values would serve John well throughout his life and help him to achieve the remarkable success that he did.

Despite his father’s abandonment, John remained in contact with him and even worked for him briefly in his early twenties. However, their relationship was fraught with tension and disagreements. William was a notorious charlatan who made a living selling snake oil and other dubious remedies to gullible customers. John, on the other hand, was a shrewd businessman who believed in building a reputation for honesty and fair dealing.

One of the most significant sources of tension between father and son was their differing views on religion. William was a devout Baptist who believed that the accumulation of wealth was sinful. John, on the other hand, was deeply religious but believed that wealth could be a force for good in the world. This difference in philosophy would ultimately lead to a complete estrangement between father and son that lasted until William’s death in 1906.

Despite the challenges he faced in his upbringing, John D. Rockefeller, Sr. went on to become one of the most successful (ie ruthless) businessmen in American history. He co-founded the Standard Oil Company in 1870, which quickly became one of the dominant players in the American oil industry. Rockefeller’s business acumen and relentless drive for efficiency helped to revolutionize the oil industry and paved the way for the rise of the modern industrial economy.

John D. Rockefeller Sr.’s upbringing was marked by turbulence and challenges, including his father’s abandonment and their differing views on religion and business. However, Rockefeller’s strong work ethic, business acumen, and religious faith helped him to overcome these challenges and achieve remarkable success in his career. Rockefeller’s legacy continues to be felt to this day, and his life serves as a testament to the power of WEALTH and DECEPTION!

3 – The Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation, was established in 1913. The foundation’s primary objective was to promote the well-being of humanity throughout the world. In other words, they wanted to exploit resources and use corporate propaganda to promote a positive image. One of the major areas of focus for the foundation was education. The foundation believed that education (ie indoctrination) was essential for the progress and development of society. Rockefeller was passionate about indoctrination by undermining education, and he believed that it was the responsibility of the wealthy to contribute to manipulating society by masquerading it as philanthropy.

The Rockefeller Foundation played a significant role in shaping the American education system to its own desires by ensur8ing a wage slave work force maintains its indefinite grip on society. The foundation provided funding for educational research and development. It also supported the establishment of educational institutions and the creation of indoctrination programs. The foundation was instrumental in promoting educational manipulation and lies in the United States.

One of the major contributions of the Rockefeller Foundation to the American education system was the development of the “Flexner Report.” Abraham Flexner was commissioned by the Rockefeller Foundation to conduct a study of medical education in the United States. The report, which was published in 1910, was a scathing critique of the state of medical education in the United States. The report led to significant reforms in medical education, including the standardization of medical school curricula and the closure of sub-standard medical schools.

The Flexner Report had a significant impact on American education in general. The report highlighted the importance of standardization and quality in education. It led to the establishment of accreditation agencies, which ensured that educational institutions met certain standards. The report also emphasized the importance of research in education. This led to the creation of research-based educational programs, which became the norm in American education.

The Rockefeller Foundation also played a significant role in promoting educational institutions and programs. The foundation provided funding for the establishment of universities, including the University of Chicago and the Johns Hopkins University. The foundation also supported the establishment of educational programs in various fields, including medicine, public health, and agriculture.

The impact of the Rockefeller Foundation on American education is still evident today. The foundation’s emphasis on research-based education and the importance of quality and standardization have become central to the American education system. The foundation’s support of the establishment of educational institutions and programs has led to the creation of some of the most prestigious universities in the world.

John D. Rockefeller’s “philanthropy” had a significant impact on American education. Through his foundation, he played a key role in promoting educational research and development and supporting the establishment of educational institutions and programs. The foundation’s emphasis on research-based education and the importance of quality and standardization have become central to the American education system. Rockefeller’s support of the Flexner Report led to significant reforms in medical education, which had a ripple effect on education in general. The establishment of accreditation agencies and the emphasis on research-based education that resulted from the report have become the norm in American education. Rockefeller’s contributions to American education are still evident today, with some of the most prestigious universities in the world owing their existence to his philanthropy.

4 – Bite the Hand that Feeds!

Rockefeller’s first tactic was to use his vast wealth and power to influence politicians and the media. He made large donations to political campaigns and to newspapers, which resulted in favorable coverage of his company and its practices. He also used his influence to prevent the passage of laws that would have protected workers’ rights and regulated the oil industry. For example, he opposed the eight-hour workday, which was a demand of workers in the late 19th century. He argued that it would reduce productivity and lead to higher costs, which would hurt the economy.

Rockefeller’s second tactic was to use violence and intimidation to suppress worker’s rights and frustrations. He hired Pinkerton detectives to spy on workers and infiltrate labor unions. He also used violence to break up strikes and protests. In 1892, the workers at his Homestead steel plant in Pennsylvania went on strike, demanding better wages and working conditions. Rockefeller responded by hiring a private army of Pinkerton detectives, who engaged in a deadly firefight with the strikers. The strike was eventually broken and the workers were forced to accept the company’s terms.

Rockefeller’s third tactic was to use the concept of “welfare capitalism” to suppress worker’s rights and frustrations. He believed that providing workers with benefits, such as housing, healthcare, and education, would make them more loyal and less likely to strike. However, these benefits were often tied to the worker’s continued employment with the company and were used to control them. Workers who spoke out against the company or organized unions were often fired and lost their benefits.

John D. Rockefeller employed a variety of tactics to suppress worker’s rights and frustrations. He used his wealth and power to influence politicians and the media, used violence and intimidation to break up strikes and protests, and used the concept of “welfare capitalism” to control workers. These tactics were effective in suppressing worker’s rights and frustrations, but they also resulted in a legacy of exploitation and abuse. It was not until the early 20th century, with the rise of the labor movement and the passage of laws protecting workers’ rights, that the conditions for workers began to improve.

John D. Rockefeller is one of the most well-known and controversial figures in American business history. Born in 1839 in upstate New York, Rockefeller went on to become one of the wealthiest men in history, amassing a fortune through his leadership of Standard Oil and other business ventures. However, Rockefeller’s legacy is not without controversy. This essay provides a detailed analysis of the criticisms towards John D. Rockefeller.

One of the primary criticisms towards Rockefeller is his role in creating a monopoly in the oil industry. Rockefeller’s company, Standard Oil, was able to achieve a dominant position in the industry through a combination of aggressive business tactics and strategic acquisitions. Standard Oil controlled over 90% of the refining capacity in the United States by the late 1800s, allowing it to dictate prices and crush competitors. This led to accusations that Standard Oil was engaging in anti-competitive behavior and violating antitrust laws.

While he was known for introducing innovative management practices, such as profit-sharing and employee benefits, he was also accused of exploiting workers and suppressing labor unions. Standard Oil was notorious for its harsh working conditions and low wages, which led to strikes and protests by workers. Rockefeller’s management style was seen as authoritarian and paternalistic, with little regard for the rights and well-being of workers.

In addition to his business practices, Rockefeller was also criticized for his philanthropic activities. While he donated millions of dollars to charitable causes, his motives were often questioned. Some critics argued that Rockefeller used his philanthropy as a way to deflect attention from his controversial business practices, while others saw it as a way to exert influence over public policy and shape public opinion.

Another criticism of Rockefeller was his role in the environmental damage caused by the oil industry. Standard Oil was responsible for significant pollution and environmental degradation, particularly in the areas surrounding its refineries and pipelines. This led to public outcry and calls for greater regulation of the industry. Rockefeller’s response to these concerns was seen as inadequate, with critics arguing that he prioritized profits over the well-being of communities and the environment.

Despite these criticisms, Rockefeller was also praised for his business acumen and contributions to American industry. He was a pioneer of modern business practices, introducing new technologies and management techniques that helped to increase efficiency and productivity. Rockefeller was also a major philanthropist, donating millions of dollars to support education, healthcare, and scientific research.

5 – A Father’s Stern Hand

John D. Rockefeller, the founder of Standard Oil Company, was one of the richest and most powerful men in American history. He was also a father of six children who suffered from his stern hand. Rockefeller’s abusive nature towards his children is a well-documented fact. This essay aims to offer historical insight into the abusive nature of John D. Rockefeller towards his children.

John D. Rockefeller had six children with his wife, Laura Spelman Rockefeller. Their children were Elizabeth, Alice, Alta, Edith, John Jr., and William. Rockefeller was an authoritarian father who believed in strict discipline and obedience. He was also a devout Baptist who believed in the importance of education and hard work.

Despite his beliefs in discipline and obedience, Rockefeller’s parenting style was abusive. He was known to physically and emotionally abuse his children. One of his children, Edith, once said, “My father’s attitude towards us was one of discipline and punishment. He was never warm, never affectionate.” Rockefeller’s children were afraid of him and lived in fear of his wrath.

Rockefeller was also known to be stingy with his money. He would often make his children work for their allowance and would berate them if they spent too much. In a letter to his son, John Jr., he wrote, “I have always told you that extravagance is a great evil, and I hope you will never forget it.”

One of the most disturbing aspects of Rockefeller’s abusive nature was his treatment of his son, John Jr. Rockefeller was disappointed with his son’s lack of interest in business and his choice to become a philanthropist. He would often belittle him in public and compare him unfavorably to his other children. In a letter to his son, he wrote, “I wish you had a little more of the ‘devil-may-care’ spirit of your brother.”

The impact of Rockefeller’s abusive nature on his children was significant. His children grew up in an environment of fear and anxiety. They were never able to form a close relationship with their father, and some of them suffered from mental health issues as a result.

One of Rockefeller’s daughters, Alice, suffered from depression and anxiety throughout her life. She wrote in her autobiography that her father’s sternness and lack of affection had a profound impact on her mental health. Another daughter, Edith, suffered from panic attacks and depression. She wrote in her memoir, “My father’s coldness and lack of affection had a damaging effect on my emotional well-being.”

John D. Rockefeller was a man of great wealth and power, but he was also a man who abused his children. His parenting style was authoritarian and abusive, and his children suffered as a result. The impact of his abuse on his children was significant and long-lasting. It is important to acknowledge the dark side of Rockefeller’s legacy and to remember the harm he inflicted on his own family.

6 – John D Rockefeller and the Smithsonian

John D. Rockefeller, one of the wealthiest people in American history, was known for his philanthropic activities. He believed in giving back to the society that had enabled him to amass such wealth (ehrm, bullshit!). One of his most significant contributions was his involvement with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. This essay provides a detailed analysis of John D. Rockefeller’s involvement with the Smithsonian Institution.

The Smithsonian Institution is a research and educational institution located in Washington, D.C., that was founded in 1846. The Smithsonian’s mission is to increase and diffuse knowledge among men. It is composed of nineteen museums, nine research centers, and a zoo. The institution is dedicated to the preservation of artifacts, scientific research, and education.

Rockefeller’s involvement with the Smithsonian began in the early 20th century. In 1928, he donated $1.5 million to the Smithsonian to fund the construction of the National Museum of Art, which was later renamed the National Museum of American History. The museum was built to house the Smithsonian’s collection of American art and artifacts. The donation was the largest single gift the Smithsonian had ever received at that time.

In addition to the donation, Rockefeller also served as a member of the Smithsonian’s Board of Regents from 1930 to 1958. The Board of Regents is the governing body of the Smithsonian Institution. During his time on the board, Rockefeller helped the institution acquire several important collections, including the papers of Thomas Jefferson and the Wright Brothers.

Rockefeller’s involvement with the Smithsonian was not limited to financial contributions and serving on the board. He also played a role in shaping the institution’s policies. For example, he advocated for the Smithsonian to become more involved in scientific research. He believed that the institution should use its resources to support research in fields such as medicine, agriculture, and physics.

Rockefeller’s contributions to the Smithsonian were not without controversy. Some critics argued that his donations were an attempt to buy influence over the institution. Others criticized his role in shaping the Smithsonian’s policies, arguing that he was trying to use the institution to further his own interests.

Despite the controversy, Rockefeller’s involvement with the Smithsonian had a significant impact on the institution. His donations helped to fund important projects, such as the construction of the National Museum of American History. His advocacy for scientific research helped to shape the institution’s mission and priorities.

John D. Rockefeller’s involvement with the Smithsonian Institution was significant. His donations and service on the board helped to fund important projects and shape the institution’s policies. While his involvement was not without controversy, his contributions had a lasting impact on the Smithsonian. Today, the institution continues to fulfill its mission of increasing and diffusing knowledge among men, thanks in part to the contributions of John D. Rockefeller.

7 – Nephilim Remains

The Smithsonian Institution is a world-renowned research and educational organization that is dedicated to the increase and diffusion of knowledge. Founded in 1846, the Smithsonian has played a vital role in the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in the United States and around the world. However, the Smithsonian has been the subject of controversy regarding its involvement with the discovery and classification of Nephilim remains, which are purported to be the skeletal remains of giant human-like beings. This essay aims to provide a detailed analysis of the Smithsonian’s involvement with Nephilim remains.

The term Nephilim is derived from the Hebrew word “Nephilim” which means “giants” or “those who have fallen.” In the Old Testament, the Nephilim are described as the offspring of the “sons of God” and the “daughters of men.” Some biblical scholars believe that the Nephilim were a race of giants that lived on the earth before the Great Flood.

In recent years, there have been numerous reports of the discovery of Nephilim remains in various parts of the world. These remains are often described as being the skeletal remains of human-like beings that are much larger than the average human being. Some of these remains are said to be over 10 feet tall, with elongated skulls and other physical features that are not consistent with modern human anatomy.

The Smithsonian has been accused of covering up evidence of the existence of Nephilim remains. According to some conspiracy theories, the Smithsonian has been involved in a deliberate campaign to suppress evidence of the existence of these beings, in order to maintain the status quo of the scientific establishment.

The Smithsonian has a long history of conducting research into the origins of human beings, and has been involved in the study of human remains from all over the world. The Smithsonian’s involvement in the study of Nephilim remains is no different from its involvement in the study of any other type of human remains, but destroying them is another thing all together.

The Smithsonian’s involvement with Nephilim remains is largely a matter of speculation and conspiracy theories. There is no evidence to support the claims that the Smithsonian has covered up evidence of the existence of these beings. The Smithsonian has a long history of conducting research into the origins of human beings, and its involvement in the study of Nephilim remains is no different from its involvement in the study of any other type of human remains. The study of human remains is a vital part of the scientific pursuit of knowledge, and it is important that researchers be allowed to conduct their work without interference or prejudice.

8 – A Robber Barron’s Exploits

John D. Rockefeller, one of the most famous and controversial business magnates in American history, was known for his incredible wealth. He is regarded as one of the greatest “Robber Barons” of his time, a term used to describe the wealthy industrialists who emerged during the late nineteenth century. While Rockefeller’s legacy has been a topic of debate among historians, there is no doubt that his wealth was built on a series of controversial practices and unethical exploits. This essay will explore some of the questionable tactics that Rockefeller employed to accumulate his vast fortune.

One of the most notable exploits of John D. Rockefeller was his aggressive and often ruthless business practices. Rockefeller was a master of the oil industry, and he used his power to control the market and eliminate competition. He was known to employ tactics such as predatory pricing, where he would sell oil at a loss to drive his competitors out of business. He was also known to use his immense wealth to buy up smaller companies that he saw as a threat to his dominance of the industry.

Rockefeller’s monopoly on the oil industry was further solidified by his creation of the Standard Oil Trust in 1882. The trust was a combination of many of the smaller oil companies that Rockefeller had acquired, and it allowed him to control the entire oil industry from production to distribution. This kind of consolidation of power was unprecedented in American business at the time and was met with widespread criticism.

Another exploitative tactic employed by Rockefeller was his treatment of his workers. His oil refineries were known for their dangerous and unsanitary conditions, and workers were often subjected to long hours and low wages. Rockefeller was also known for his anti-union stance and would go to great lengths to prevent his workers from organizing. He employed private detectives to spy on his workers and would often use violence to break up strikes.

Rockefeller’s exploitation of natural resources was also a major cause for concern. The oil industry was notorious for its environmental impact, and Rockefeller’s Standard Oil was no exception. The company was responsible for numerous oil spills and leaks, which caused damage to both the environment and public health. Additionally, Rockefeller was known to engage in unethical practices in order to acquire oil reserves. He would often use his vast wealth to bribe government officials and manipulate landowners into selling their oil-rich land at a fraction of its value.

John D. Rockefeller’s wealth was built on a series of controversial and unethical practices. From his aggressive business tactics to his mistreatment of workers and exploitation of natural resources, Rockefeller’s legacy raises important questions about the role of business in society. While he was undoubtedly a successful businessman, his exploits demonstrate the dangers of unchecked corporate power.

9 – The Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation is a philanthropic organization that was established in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller. The organization has been involved in various activities aimed at promoting the well-being of people around the world. One of the ways the foundation has been involved in promoting its mission is through mergers and purchases of businesses. This essay focuses on the business mergers and purchases made by the Rockefeller Foundation and their reasoning behind such business decisions.

Business Mergers and Purchases by the Rockefeller Foundation

  • The Rockefeller Sanitary Commission and the International Health Board

In 1913, the Rockefeller Foundation established the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission, which was aimed at controlling hookworm disease in the southern states of the United States. In 1914, the Rockefeller Foundation established the International Health Board (IHB), which was aimed at promoting public health globally. In 1927, the Rockefeller Foundation merged the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission and the IHB to form the International Health Division (IHD). The reason behind this merger was to enhance the efficiency of the organizations in promoting public health globally.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the China Medical Board

In 1914, the Rockefeller Foundation established the China Medical Board (CMB) to promote medical education and research in China. In 1928, the Rockefeller Foundation merged with the CMB to form the China Medical Board of New York. The reason behind this merger was to enhance the efficiency of the organizations in promoting medical education and research in China.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial

In 1918, John D. Rockefeller established the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial (LSRM) in memory of his wife. The purpose of the LSRM was to provide funds for charitable activities. In 1929, the Rockefeller Foundation and the LSRM merged to form the Rockefeller Foundation. The reason behind this merger was to enhance the efficiency of the organizations in promoting charitable activities.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the Social Science Research Council

In 1923, the Rockefeller Foundation established the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) to promote research in social sciences. In 1927, the Rockefeller Foundation merged with the SSRC to form the Social Science Research Council of America. The reason behind this merger was to enhance the efficiency of the organizations in promoting research in social sciences.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the General Education Board

In 1902, John D. Rockefeller established the General Education Board (GEB) to promote education in the United States. In 1928, the Rockefeller Foundation merged with the GEB to form the General Education Board, Inc. The reason behind this merger was to enhance the efficiency of the organizations in promoting education in the United States.

The Rockefeller Foundation made various business decisions aimed at promoting its mission. The mergers and purchases were aimed at enhancing the efficiency of the organizations in promoting public health, medical education and research, charitable activities, research in social sciences, and education in the United States. The mergers and purchases were also aimed at reducing duplication of efforts and enhancing the utilization of resources.

Playing the Game: The Enduring Influence of the Rockefeller Foundation on American Business and Politics

The Rockefeller Foundation is one of the most well-known and influential philanthropic organizations in the world. Established in 1913 by oil magnate John D. Rockefeller Sr., the foundation has had a significant impact on a wide range of fields, from public health to the arts. However, the foundation’s influence has perhaps been most keenly felt in the realm of American business and politics. In this essay, we will explore the various business ventures the Rockefeller Foundation has had throughout American business history and provide information on how the foundation still influences American business and politics today.

  • The Early Years: Standard Oil and the Sherman Antitrust Act

To understand the influence of the Rockefeller Foundation on American business and politics, it is necessary to start with the foundation’s origins. John D. Rockefeller Sr. made his fortune in the oil industry, primarily through the establishment of Standard Oil, which at its peak controlled over 90% of the oil refineries in the United States. However, Standard Oil’s dominance eventually attracted the attention of government regulators, and in 1911, the Supreme Court ruled that Standard Oil was an illegal monopoly under the Sherman Antitrust Act.

Rather than fight the government’s decision, Rockefeller chose to dissolve Standard Oil and create a number of smaller companies, known as the “Baby Standards.” This move allowed Rockefeller to maintain significant control over the oil industry while avoiding further antitrust action. However, it also paved the way for the creation of a number of powerful oil companies, including ExxonMobil and Chevron, which still dominate the industry today.

  • The Birth of the Rockefeller Foundation

Following the dissolution of Standard Oil, Rockefeller turned his attention to philanthropy. In 1913, he established the Rockefeller Foundation with the goal of “promoting the well-being of mankind throughout the world.” Over the years, the foundation has funded a wide range of initiatives, from medical research to the arts. However, it has also been involved in a number of business ventures that have had a significant impact on American business and politics.

One of the most notable of these ventures was the creation of the Industrial Relations Counselors (IRC) in 1926. The IRC was established with the goal of promoting “industrial peace” by providing employers with information and advice on labor relations. The IRC quickly became a major player in the field of labor relations, and its influence was felt throughout American business and politics.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and World War II

During World War II, the Rockefeller Foundation played a significant role in the war effort. One of its most notable contributions was the creation of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), which was established in 1942 with the goal of gathering intelligence and conducting covert operations in support of the war effort. The OSS was the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and its creation was a significant milestone in the history of American intelligence.

The foundation also played a role in the post-war reconstruction of Europe. In 1944, it established the European Refugee Fund, which provided assistance to refugees displaced by the war. The fund eventually evolved into the International Rescue Committee, which still provides humanitarian assistance to refugees and other displaced persons around the world.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and American Business Today

Today, the Rockefeller Foundation continues to be involved in a wide range of initiatives, many of which have significant implications for American business and politics. One of these initiatives is the 100 Res
ilient Cities program, which was launched in 2013 with the goal of helping cities around the world become more resilient in the face of social, economic, and environmental challenges. The program provides funding and technical assistance to cities, and has already reached over 90 cities worldwide.

Another initiative with significant implications for American business and politics is the Rockefeller Foundation’s involvement in impact investing. Impact investing involves investing in companies and organizations that have a social or environmental mission, in addition to a financial return. The Rockefeller Foundation has been a leader in this field, and has helped to establish a number of impact investing funds and initiatives.

Finally, the Rockefeller Foundation has been involved in a number of initiatives related to climate change and energy policy. In 2014, it launched the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, which was tasked with examining the economic impacts of climate change and the potential for a low-carbon economy. The commission’s findings have had significant implications for global climate policy, and have helped to shape the debate on the role of business in addressing climate change.

The Rockefeller Foundation has had a significant impact on American business and politics throughout its history. From the creation of Standard Oil and the subsequent antitrust action, to the establishment of the Industrial Relations Counselors and the OSS, the foundation has played a major role in shaping the business and political landscape of the United States. Today, the foundation continues to be involved in a wide range of initiatives, including the 100 Resilient Cities program, impact investing, and climate change and energy policy. Its influence is likely to endure for many years to come.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the General Election Board

The Rockefeller Foundation was established in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller, Sr., one of the wealthiest men in American history. The foundation was created with an initial endowment of $100 million, which was a staggering sum of money at the time. The foundation’s mission was to “promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world.”

Initially, the foundation focused on supporting medical research and education. It funded the construction of several major medical research facilities, including the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City. The foundation also supported the establishment of public health programs, including efforts to combat infectious diseases like yellow fever and malaria.

In addition to its medical initiatives, the foundation also supported education and social welfare programs. It funded the establishment of the International Education Board, which provided scholarships for students to study abroad. The foundation also supported the establishment of the Social Science Research Council, which conducted research in the fields of economics, sociology, and political science.

One of the key ways in which the Rockefeller Foundation exerted influence on the American education system was through its support of the General Education Board (GEB). The GEB was established in 1902 with funding from John D. Rockefeller, Sr. and was later absorbed into the Rockefeller Foundation.

The GEB was responsible for funding educational initiatives across the United States, with a particular focus on rural areas and underserved communities. It funded the construction of schools, the establishment of teacher training programs, and the development of curriculum materials.

While the GEB’s efforts were laudable, some critics have argued that the foundation’s support came with strings attached. They contend that the foundation used its funding to promote a particular vision of education that emphasized conformity, efficiency, and the development of a skilled workforce. This vision, they argue, was not necessarily in the best interests of students or educators.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and the American Medical Establishment

The Rockefeller Foundation’s influence on the American medical establishment has been the subject of particular scrutiny. The foundation played a key role in the development of modern medicine in the United States, funding the construction of major medical research facilities and supporting the work of prominent researchers.

However, the foundation’s influence extended beyond its financial contributions. It also played a role in shaping the priorities of the medical establishment. For example, the foundation supported the development of medical specialties like radiology and psychiatry, which were not widely recognized at the time. It also funded public health initiatives, including efforts to combat infectious diseases and improve sanitation.

Critics of the foundation argue that its influence on the medical establishment came at a cost. They contend that the foundation’s focus on research and specialization came at the expense of primary care and preventative medicine. They also argue that the foundation’s support for medical education was conditioned on the adoption of a particular approach to medical education, one that emphasized the use of scientific methods and the importance of research.

The Rockefeller Foundation has played a significant role in shaping the American education and medical systems. Its support for medical research and education has undoubtedly had a positive impact on the field, but its influence has also been the subject of criticism. Critics have argued that the foundation’s support came with strings attached, and that its focus on research and specialization came at the expense of primary care and preventative medicine. They also contend that the foundation’s vision of education emphasized conformity and efficiency at the expense of student and educator autonomy.

The Rockefeller Foundation was established in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., with the aim of promoting the well-being of humanity through philanthropy and scientific research. In the 1920s, the foundation began to focus on tropical diseases and invested heavily in research programs aimed at finding cures for these ailments. The Amazon Rainforest was seen as a treasure trove of potentially valuable medicinal plants, and the foundation invested significant resources in exploring and cataloging the region’s flora.

One of the foundation’s most significant contributions to Rainforest research was its support for the Brazilian Institute for Amazon Research (INPA). Founded in 1952, INPA was tasked with studying the Amazon’s ecology, biodiversity, and potential for economic development. The Rockefeller Foundation provided significant funding for INPA’s research programs, and its scientists played a key role in the institute’s work.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the Rockefeller Foundation’s focus shifted towards the development of new drugs and medicines. The Rainforest was seen as a potential source of valuable compounds that could be used to treat a range of diseases, from cancer to malaria. The foundation invested heavily in Rainforest research during this period, funding numerous expeditions to collect plant and animal samples for analysis.

One of the most famous of these expeditions was the 1962 Rockefeller Expedition to the Amazon. Led by noted botanist Richard Evans Schultes, the expedition collected over 6,000 plant specimens, many of which had never been seen before. The expedition’s findings were later used to develop new drugs, including the anti-cancer drug Taxol.

The Rockefeller Foundation also played a key role in the development of the Rainforest Conservation Foundation, which was established in the 1980s to promote sustainable development and conservation in the region. The foundation provided significant funding for the organization, which worked to protect the Rainforest’s biodiversity and promote responsible resource management.

While the Rockefeller Foundation’s work in the Amazon Rainforest has been credited with significant scientific and medical advancements, it has also been criticized for its role in the exploitation of the region’s resources. Some have accused the foundation of taking advantage of the Rainforest’s biodiversity for commercial gain, while neglecting the rights and needs of the indigenous communities who call the region home.

The Rockefeller Foundation played a significant role in the exploration and exploitation of the Amazon Rainforest for the benefit of the pharmaceutical industry. Its support for INPA and other Rainforest research programs helped to advance scientific knowledge of the region’s ecology and potential for economic development. However, the foundation’s work in the Rainforest has also been criticized for its potential negative impact on the region’s indigenous communities and environment.

10 – Rainforest Exploitations

The Amazon Rainforest is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet, containing a vast array of plant species that have been used for centuries by indigenous peoples for medicinal purposes. However, the arrival of Western medicine and the exploitation of the rainforest by corporations such as the Rockefeller Foundation have threatened the future of these traditional remedies. This essay will explore the exploitations committed by The Rockefeller Foundation in the Amazon Rainforest, as well as the conspiracies surrounding its suppression of herbal remedies discovered in the rainforest.

The Rockefeller Foundation, a philanthropic organization established in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller, has been involved in numerous projects in the Amazon Rainforest since the early 1900s. These projects have ranged from funding medical research to promoting economic development in the region. However, some of the Foundation’s activities in the Amazon have been controversial, especially in relation to the exploitation of natural resources.

In the 1940s, the Rockefeller Foundation launched a project to study the medicinal properties of plants in the Amazon Rainforest. The project was led by Richard Evans Schultes, a renowned ethnobotanist who spent years studying the traditional uses of plants by indigenous peoples. Schultes discovered numerous medicinal plants with potential applications in Western medicine, including curare, a muscle relaxant used in surgery, and yage, a hallucinogenic plant used in traditional spiritual practices.

However, the Rockefeller Foundation’s interest in the medicinal properties of Amazonian plants was not purely altruistic. The Foundation had a vested interest in developing new drugs and medicines that could be patented and sold for profit. This led to accusations that the Foundation was exploiting the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples for commercial gain.

The exploitation of natural resources in the Amazon Rainforest has had a significant impact on the traditional remedies used by indigenous peoples. The destruction of habitats and the depletion of plant species have threatened the future of these remedies, while the promotion of Western medicine has led to a decline in their use.

One of the most controversial aspects of the Rockefeller Foundation’s activities in the Amazon Rainforest is the suppression of herbal remedies discovered by Schultes and his team. According to some conspiracy theories, the Foundation deliberately suppressed information about these remedies in order to protect the profits of the pharmaceutical industry.

There is some evidence to support these claims. In the 1980s, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched a campaign to promote traditional medicine, including the use of herbal remedies. The campaign was supported by numerous countries, including Brazil, which has a rich tradition of herbal medicine. However, the campaign was opposed by the pharmaceutical industry, which saw it as a threat to its profits.

In 1993, the Rockefeller Foundation established the International Cooperative Biodiversity Group (ICBG), which aimed to “discover and develop new drugs from natural sources in developing countries”. The ICBG worked with local communities in the Amazon Rainforest to identify plants with potential medicinal properties. However, the ICBG’s activities were criticized for their lack of transparency, and some accused the Foundation of exploiting the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples.

The Amazon Rainforest is a treasure trove of natural resources, including medicinal plants with potential applications in Western medicine. However, the exploitation of these resources by corporations such as the Rockefeller Foundation has threatened the future of traditional remedies used by indigenous peoples. The suppression of information about these remedies, coupled with the promotion of Western medicine, has led to concerns about the preservation of traditional knowledge and the equitable sharing of benefits from the exploitation of natural resources.

While there is some evidence to support the claim that the Rockefeller Foundation suppressed information about herbal remedies in the Amazon Rainforest, it is important to note that the Foundation has also supported numerous initiatives to promote the preservation of traditional knowledge and the sustainable use of natural resources. For example, the Foundation has funded projects to promote agroforestry and sustainable logging in the Amazon, as well as initiatives to support indigenous communities in the region.

Moving forward, it is clear that there is a need for greater transparency and accountability in the exploitation of natural resources in the Amazon Rainforest. This includes ensuring that local communities are involved in decision-making processes and that the benefits of any commercial exploitation are shared equitably. It also requires a greater recognition of the value of traditional knowledge and the need to preserve it for future generations.

The exploitations committed by The Rockefeller Foundation in the Amazon Rainforest have had a significant impact on the preservation of traditional remedies and the equitable sharing of benefits from the exploitation of natural resources. While the suppression of herbal remedies discovered in the rainforest remains a controversial issue, it is important to recognize that the Foundation has also supported numerous initiatives to promote sustainability and the preservation of traditional knowledge. Moving forward, greater transparency and accountability will be needed to ensure that the exploitation of the Amazon Rainforest benefits all stakeholders, including local communities and the wider global community.

11 – Metastasizing Wealth Through Pharmaceutical Suppression: A Detailed Look at the Conspiracies Surrounding The Rockefeller Foundation and the American Medical Establishment

The Rockefeller Foundation has been a major player in the field of medicine and public health for over a century. Founded by John D. Rockefeller in 1913, the foundation has funded countless medical research projects and has been instrumental in the development of many important medical breakthroughs. However, over the years, the foundation has also been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories, particularly surrounding its alleged influence on the American medical establishment and the pharmaceutical industry. In this essay, we will explore some of the most popular and persistent conspiracy theories surrounding The Rockefeller Foundation and its impact on cancer research, pharmaceuticals, and the American medical establishment.

  • Conspiracy Theory #1: The Rockefeller Foundation Controls the American Medical Establishment

One of the most persistent conspiracy theories surrounding The Rockefeller Foundation is that it controls the American medical establishment. According to this theory, the foundation has used its vast wealth and influence to shape medical research, medical education, and medical practice in the United States. Proponents of this theory point to the fact that the foundation has funded many of the most prestigious medical schools and research institutions in the country, as well as numerous medical research projects and initiatives.

While it is true that The Rockefeller Foundation has been a major source of funding for medical research and education in the United States, there is little evidence to support the idea that it controls the American medical establishment. Medical research and education are highly decentralized fields, with numerous institutions and individuals involved in the process. While the foundation’s funding has undoubtedly had an impact on the direction of medical research and education in the United States, it is unlikely that it wields the kind of centralized control that conspiracy theorists suggest.

  • Conspiracy Theory #2: The Rockefeller Foundation Has Suppressed Alternative Cancer Treatments

Another popular conspiracy theory surrounding The Rockefeller Foundation is that it has suppressed alternative cancer treatments in order to protect the profits of the pharmaceutical industry. According to this theory, the foundation has used its influence to discredit and marginalize alternative cancer treatments, such as vitamin therapy, herbal remedies, and other non-pharmaceutical approaches, in order to maintain the dominance of the pharmaceutical industry.

While there is some evidence to suggest that The Rockefeller Foundation has been skeptical of alternative cancer treatments, there is little evidence to support the idea that it has actively suppressed them. Cancer research is a highly competitive field, with many different institutions and individuals competing for funding and recognition. If alternative cancer treatments were truly effective, it is unlikely that they could be suppressed by a single organization, no matter how wealthy or influential.

  • Conspiracy Theory #3: The Rockefeller Foundation Created the War on Cancer to Benefit the Pharmaceutical Industry

Another popular conspiracy theory is that The Rockefeller Foundation created the “war on cancer” in order to benefit the pharmaceutical industry. According to this theory, the foundation used its influence to promote the idea that cancer was a “disease of the genes” that could only be treated with expensive pharmaceutical drugs. This, in turn, led to the development of a highly profitable cancer drug industry that has been driven by profits rather than by concern for public health.

While it is true that the pharmaceutical industry has profited greatly from the development of cancer drugs, there is little evidence to support the idea that The Rockefeller Foundation created the war on cancer in order to benefit the industry. The war on cancer was a response to a genuine public health crisis, and it was driven
by a desire to understand and treat a disease that had long been considered incurable. While it is true that some pharmaceutical companies have prioritized profits over public health, it is unlikely that The Rockefeller Foundation had a hand in creating this dynamic.

  • Conspiracy Theory #4: The Rockefeller Foundation Created the AIDS Virus as Part of a Population Control Scheme

Perhaps the most infamous conspiracy theory surrounding The Rockefeller Foundation is that it created the AIDS virus as part of a population control scheme. According to this theory, the foundation developed the virus in a laboratory and then deliberately spread it throughout the world in order to reduce the global population.

This theory has been thoroughly debunked by numerous scientific studies and investigations. The overwhelming consensus among scientists is that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is a naturally occurring virus that likely originated in chimpanzees in central Africa. While it is true that The Rockefeller Foundation has funded research into HIV and AIDS, there is no evidence to suggest that it played any role in the creation or spread of the virus.

The Rockefeller Foundation has been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories over the years, particularly surrounding its alleged influence on the American medical establishment and the pharmaceutical industry. While some of these theories contain elements of truth, most are based on misunderstandings or outright falsehoods.

12 – Control the Information, Control the Mind

The history of the United States has been shaped by various powerful individuals and institutions. One such institution that had a significant impact on American textbooks for public schools is the Rockefeller Foundation. The foundation, which was established in 1913, funded various education initiatives that aimed to promote the dissemination of scientific knowledge and promote social engineering. This essay seeks to examine the impact that the Rockefeller Foundation had on American textbooks for public schools and their publishing and distribution.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation and American Textbooks

The Rockefeller Foundation played a crucial role in shaping American textbooks for public schools in the early to mid-twentieth century. The foundation funded various education initiatives that aimed to promote the dissemination of scientific knowledge and promote social engineering. One of the most significant initiatives that the foundation supported was the General Education Board (GEB). The GEB, which was established in 1902, aimed to improve the quality of education in the United States by providing funding for public schools and universities.

The GEB received significant funding from the Rockefeller Foundation, which allowed it to expand its reach and influence. One of the ways in which the GEB influenced American textbooks was through its funding of the National Education Association (NEA). The NEA, which was the largest teacher organization in the United States, received funding from the GEB to develop textbooks for use in public schools.

The NEA used the funding from the GEB to establish the American Historical Association’s Committee of Seven on the Teaching of History and Civics in the Public Schools in 1899. The committee was tasked with developing a curriculum for the teaching of history and civics in public schools. The curriculum that the committee developed was heavily influenced by the Rockefeller Foundation’s ideals of social engineering and scientific management.

The committee’s curriculum emphasized the importance of teaching students about the history of industrialization and the role of science and technology in American society. The curriculum also emphasized the importance of teaching students about the importance of social order and discipline. The committee’s curriculum was widely adopted by public schools in the United States, and it had a significant impact on the content of American textbooks.

  • The Rockefeller Foundation’s Influence on Textbook Publishing and Distribution

The Rockefeller Foundation’s influence on American textbooks was not limited to the content of the textbooks. The foundation also had a significant impact on the publishing and distribution of American textbooks. The foundation provided funding for textbook publishers and distributors, which allowed them to expand their operations and reach a wider audience.

One of the most significant publishers that received funding from the Rockefeller Foundation was the Ginn and Company. The Ginn and Company received funding from the Rockefeller Foundation to develop and publish textbooks that were based on the committee’s curriculum. The textbooks that the Ginn and Company developed were widely adopted by public schools in the United States, and they had a significant impact on the content of American textbooks.

The Rockefeller Foundation also provided funding for textbook distributors, such as the American Book Company and the Houghton Mifflin Company. The funding that these companies received from the Rockefeller Foundation allowed them to expand their operations and distribute textbooks to a wider audience. The foundation also provided funding for the establishment of book depositories, which helped to ensure that textbooks were readily available to students in public schools.

In conclusion, the Rockefeller Foundation had a significant impact on American textbooks for public schools and their publishing and distribution. The foundation’s funding of education initiatives, such as the GEB and the NEA, allowed it to shape the content of American textbooks and promote its ideals of social engineering and scientific management. The foundation’s influence on American textbooks was not limited to the content of the textbooks, as it also provided funding for textbook publishers and distributors, which allowed them to expand their operations and reach a wider audience. The foundation’s impact on American textbooks for public schools and their publishing and distribution highlights the power that institutions and individuals can have in shaping the education system and the knowledge that is disseminated to future generations.

13 – The GEB

The Rockefeller General Education Board (GEB) and the National Education Association (NEA) are two organizations that have played pivotal roles in shaping American education. The GEB, founded in 1902, was a philanthropic organization established by John D. Rockefeller Sr. to promote education reform in the United States. The NEA, founded in 1857, is the largest professional organization in the United States that represents teachers and education support professionals. This essay aims to describe the relationship between the GEB and the NEA over the years and how their collaboration has affected American education.

The GEB and the NEA had a close working relationship in the early 20th century. The GEB provided significant funding to the NEA for research, curriculum development, and teacher training. In 1912, the GEB provided the NEA with $100,000 to establish a Department of Superintendence, which later became the National Association of School Superintendents. The GEB also funded the creation of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) in 1954, which became the primary accrediting body for teacher education programs in the United States.

In addition to providing funding, the GEB and the NEA collaborated on several education initiatives. In 1914, the GEB and the NEA jointly sponsored a commission on the reorganization of secondary education. This commission recommended a new model of high school education that focused on academic subjects and college preparation, which became known as the “comprehensive high school” model. The NEA also worked closely with the GEB on the development of vocational education programs, which aimed to prepare students for the workforce.

However, not all collaborations between the GEB and the NEA were successful. In the 1920s, the GEB and the NEA collaborated on a project to promote eugenics, which aimed to improve the genetic quality of the population by controlling reproduction. The NEA published a report in 1923 that supported the eugenics movement, but the GEB withdrew its funding after the project was widely criticized.

Despite their early collaborations, the relationship between the GEB and the NEA became strained in the mid-20th century. One source of tension was the GEB’s support for progressive education, which emphasized child-centered learning and de-emphasized traditional academic subjects. The NEA, on the other hand, was more supportive of a traditional academic curriculum. In 1944, the GEB commissioned a report on the future of American education, which advocated for a more student-centered approach. The report was widely criticized by the NEA and other education groups, who argued that it would undermine academic standards.

Another source of tension was the GEB’s support for desegregation. In the 1950s and 1960s, the GEB provided significant funding to support desegregation efforts in Southern schools. However, the NEA was initially reluctant to support desegregation, fearing that it would alienate white teachers and parents. The NEA eventually came around to supporting desegregation, but the tension between the two organizations remained.

The GEB also came under criticism from conservative groups in the 1960s and 1970s, who accused the organization of promoting liberal ideas and undermining traditional values. The GEB’s support for progressive education and desegregation made it a target of conservative critics, who saw these policies as a threat to the status quo. The NEA, as a representative of teachers, was also criticized for being too liberal and for promoting progressive education.

In the 1980s, the relationship between the GEB and the NEA became even more strained. The GEB had shifted its focus away from education and towards other areas, such as population control and international development. The NEA was also undergoing significant changes, as it became more politically active and began to take more liberal positions on social issues. The NEA criticized the GEB for not doing enough to support education and for being too focused on other issues.

The relationship between the Rockefeller General Education Board and the National Education Association has been a complex and multifaceted one. While the two organizations had a close working relationship in the early 20th century, their collaboration became strained in the mid-20th century and beyond. Tensions arose due to differences in educational philosophy, support for desegregation, and changes in the political climate. Despite these challenges, the GEB and the NEA have both played important roles in shaping American education. The GEB’s funding and support helped to establish many important educational initiatives, while the NEA has been a powerful advocate for teachers and education reform.

14 – Just a Drop in the Bucket

John D. Rockefeller was one of the wealthiest and most influential businessmen in American history. He founded the Standard Oil Company in 1870, which eventually controlled 90% of America’s oil production, making him the richest man in the world at the time. However, along with his wealth and success came controversy and criticism. Throughout his life, Rockefeller was the target of numerous lawsuits and accusations of unethical business practices. The Rockefeller Foundation, which he established in 1913, has also faced its fair share of legal challenges. This essay will provide an overview of the lawsuits against John D. Rockefeller and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Lawsuits against John D. Rockefeller

  • The Ohio Anti-Trust Lawsuit (1890)

In 1890, the state of Ohio filed an anti-trust lawsuit against the Standard Oil Company, accusing it of monopolizing the oil industry. The case, which became known as the “Ohio Anti-Trust Lawsuit,” was one of the first anti-trust cases in American history. In 1892, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that Standard Oil was indeed a monopoly and ordered it to be dissolved. However, Standard Oil was able to avoid dissolution by reorganizing into smaller companies, including ExxonMobil, Chevron, and ConocoPhillips.

  • The Missouri Anti-Trust Lawsuit (1906)

In 1906, the state of Missouri filed an anti-trust lawsuit against Standard Oil, accusing the company of violating the state’s anti-trust laws. The case was heard by the United States Supreme Court in 1911, which ruled that Standard Oil had indeed violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890. As a result, Standard Oil was ordered to be broken up into 34 separate companies.

  • The Ida Tarbell Articles (1902-1904)

Ida Tarbell was a journalist who wrote a series of articles for McClure’s Magazine between 1902 and 1904, exposing the unethical business practices of Standard Oil. Tarbell’s articles were instrumental in raising public awareness about the dangers of monopolies and helped to build support for anti-trust legislation.

Lawsuits against the Rockefeller Foundation

  • The Guatemala Syphilis Experiment Lawsuit (2011)

In 2011, the Rockefeller Foundation was sued by the families of victims of a syphilis experiment that was conducted in Guatemala in the 1940s. The experiment, which was funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, involved intentionally infecting Guatemalan prisoners and mental patients with syphilis to test the effectiveness of penicillin. The lawsuit accused the Rockefeller Foundation of being complicit in the experiment and failing to provide adequate compensation to the victims and their families.

  • The Nigerian Oil Spill Lawsuit (2012)

In 2012, the Rockefeller Foundation was sued by Nigerian villagers who claimed that the foundation was complicit in oil spills that had devastated their communities. The lawsuit accused the Rockefeller Foundation of investing in companies that had caused the oil spills and failing to take adequate action to prevent them or to provide compensation to the affected communities.

John D. Rockefeller and the Rockefeller Foundation have both faced numerous lawsuits throughout their histories. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company was accused of monopolizing the oil industry and engaging in unethical business practices, while the Rockefeller Foundation has been accused of being complicit in human rights abuses and environmental damage. Despite these challenges, the Rockefeller family and their foundation have continued to make significant contributions to various fields, including medicine, education, and the arts. It is important to acknowledge the controversies surrounding their past actions, but also to recognize the positive impact they have had on society.

15 – Secret Societies and the Rockefeller Fortune

John D. Rockefeller is a name synonymous with wealth and power. He was the founder of the Standard Oil Company, one of the largest corporations in history. His name is often associated with philanthropy, but there is another side to the story. Rockefeller’s involvement with secret societies and questionable personal relationships and behaviors have come to light in recent years. This essay will explore these issues and provide details regarding his involvement with secret societies and questionable personal relationships and behaviors.

Rockefeller’s involvement with secret societies is a topic of much speculation and debate. One of the most prominent secret societies with which he is associated is the Illuminati. The Illuminati is a secret society that was founded in the late 18th century and is said to be dedicated to the establishment of a new world order. The society is said to have been founded by Adam Weishaupt, a professor of law in Bavaria, Germany. It is believed that Rockefeller was a member of the Illuminati and that he used his wealth and influence to further their goals.

Rockefeller’s involvement with the Illuminati is difficult to prove, but there is evidence to suggest that he was associated with the society. For example, the Rockefeller family crest includes a depiction of a pyramid with an eye at the top, which is a symbol commonly associated with the Illuminati. Additionally, some of Rockefeller’s business associates were known to be connected to secret societies, including the Skull and Bones society at Yale University.

Another secret society with which Rockefeller is associated is the Freemasons. The Freemasons are a fraternal organization that dates back to the 14th century. They are known for their secrecy and their use of symbols and rituals. It is believed that Rockefeller was a member of the Freemasons and that he used his membership to further his business interests.

Rockefeller’s personal relationships and behaviors have also come under scrutiny in recent years. One of the most controversial aspects of his personal life is his relationship with his son, John D. Rockefeller Jr. John D. Rockefeller Jr. was known to be a reclusive and introverted individual, and there are rumors that he had a strained relationship with his father. Some have suggested that this strained relationship was due to John D. Rockefeller Sr.’s demanding and controlling nature.

Another controversial aspect of Rockefeller’s personal life is his relationship with his wife, Laura Spelman Rockefeller. Laura Spelman Rockefeller was a devout Christian and a strong advocate for social justice. She was also known to be a woman of strong opinions and was not afraid to challenge her husband’s decisions. Some have suggested that Rockefeller’s relationship with his wife was strained and that he resented her for her strong will.

Rockefeller’s personal behaviors have also come under scrutiny. One of the most controversial aspects of his behavior is his treatment of his workers. Rockefeller was known to be a shrewd businessman, and he often sought to maximize his profits at the expense of his workers. He was also known to be a harsh and unforgiving boss, and there are reports of him using violence to quell labor disputes.

John D. Rockefeller’s involvement with secret societies and questionable personal relationships and behaviors is a topic of much speculation and debate. While it is difficult to prove his association with secret societies like the Illuminati and the Freemasons, there is evidence to suggest that he was involved with these organizations. Additionally, his personal relationships with his son and wife have been the subject of much scrutiny,and there are suggestions that his behavior towards his workers was unethical. It is important to note, however, that Rockefeller’s legacy is complex, and his philanthropic efforts have had a significant impact on the world. While it is important to acknowledge his questionable actions and associations, it is also important to recognize the positive contributions that he made.

16 – Hey humans! Stop FCKING!

The world population is growing at an alarming rate, and it is becoming a global concern. According to the United Nations, the world population is projected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050. This growth is putting a strain on the planet’s resources, and it is leading to environmental degradation, economic instability, and social unrest. The Rockefeller Foundation has been at the forefront of population control efforts for over a century, and this essay will discuss its contributions to population control throughout history.

The Rockefeller Foundation was founded in 1913 by John D. Rockefeller, one of the wealthiest men in American history. The foundation has been involved in numerous philanthropic activities, including population control efforts. In the 1960s and 1970s, the foundation was instrumental in promoting population control as a means of addressing global poverty. It provided funding to organizations such as the Population Council and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) to promote family planning programs in developing countries.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s involvement in population control can be traced back to the 1920s when it funded research into contraceptive methods. In 1934, the foundation provided a grant to Margaret Sanger, the founder of the American Birth Control League, which later became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. The grant was used to fund research into contraceptive methods, and it helped to pave the way for the development of the birth control pill.

During the Cold War, the Rockefeller Foundation’s population control efforts were seen as a way to combat the spread of communism. The foundation argued that rapid population growth in developing countries could lead to social and economic instability, which could be exploited by communist regimes. It provided funding to organizations such as the Population Council to promote family planning programs in developing countries, with the aim of reducing population growth rates.

In the 1980s, the Rockefeller Foundation shifted its focus from population control to reproductive health. It recognized that family planning programs alone were not enough to address the complex issue of reproductive health. The foundation provided funding to organizations such as the World Health Organization and the United Nations Population Fund to promote reproductive health programs that included family planning, maternal health, and HIV/AIDS prevention.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s population control efforts have not been without controversy. Some critics argue that its population control efforts have been coercive and have violated human rights. For example, in the 1970s, the foundation provided funding to the Indian government for a sterilization program that was criticized for being coercive and targeting poor and marginalized communities.

The Rockefeller Foundation has been a major player in population control efforts for over a century. Its contributions to the development of contraceptive methods and family planning programs have helped to address the complex issue of population growth. However, its population control efforts have not been without controversy, and some critics argue that they have violated human rights. As the world population continues to grow, it is important to consider the ethical implications of population control efforts and to ensure that they are implemented in a way that respects human rights.

17 – Conclusion

The Rockefeller Foundation has been involved in various activities aimed at promoting the well-being of people around the world. One of the ways the foundation has been involved in promoting its mission is through mergers and purchases of businesses. The mergers and purchases were aimed at enhancing the efficiency of the organizations in promoting public health, medical education and research, charitable activities, research in social sciences, and education in the United States. The Rockefeller Foundation utilized its resources to make strategic business decisions to promote its mission. The mergers and purchases allowed the organizations to share resources, knowledge, and expertise, and to work together towards a common goal. The Rockefeller Foundation’s business decisions have had a significant impact on the promotion of public health, medical education and research, charitable activities, research in social sciences, and education in the United States and globally. The foundation continues to make strategic business decisions to enhance the efficiency of its operations and to promote its mission of improving the well-being of people around the world.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s business mergers and purchases were not only aimed at promoting its mission but also had a significant impact on the organizations’ operations and the communities they served. For instance, the merger between the China Medical Board and the Rockefeller Foundation enhanced medical education and research in China. The merger allowed the organizations to pool their resources and expertise to promote medical education and research, which led to the establishment of medical schools and the training of medical professionals in China. This, in turn, improved the quality of healthcare in China and contributed to the well-being of the Chinese people.

Similarly, the merger between the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission and the International Health Board led to the establishment of the International Health Division, which played a significant role in controlling and eradicating various diseases globally. The organization was involved in the development of vaccines, treatment protocols, and public health policies that have saved millions of lives around the world.

Furthermore, the Rockefeller Foundation’s business decisions have also had a significant impact on the organizations’ employees and their families. The mergers and purchases led to the creation of new jobs, improved working conditions, and better remuneration for employees. The organizations also provided various benefits, such as healthcare, education, and housing, which improved the employees’ quality of life and that of their families.

In conclusion, the Rockefeller Foundation’s business mergers and purchases were aimed at promoting its mission of improving the well-being of people around the world. The mergers and purchases allowed the organizations to share resources, knowledge, and expertise, and to work together towards a common goal. The business decisions made by the foundation have had a significant impact on the promotion of public health, medical education and research, charitable activities, research in social sciences, and education in the United States and globally. The foundation’s business decisions have also had a positive impact on the organizations’ employees and their families, contributing to the overall well-being of communities around the world.

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