TAH – Blog Post 9 – Who Was Gilgamesh?

DISCLAIMER

I write these blog articles always in a “Devil’s Advocate” approach because I want the reader to realize the absurdity of MAINSTREAM ACADEMIA and SCIENCE and how they literally HIDE information to constantly keep us in the dark and Enlil and Ninurta happy! So, when reading my material and you find yourself getting pissed off, then wait till the end as I give my OWN personal sentiments to pulll it all together

Happy reading,

– The Awakened Hybrid

1 – Introduction

Gilgamesh is a legendary figure in ancient Sumerian mythology. However, there is also evidence to suggest that he may have been a real person who lived in Mesopotamia around 2700 BCE. This essay will offer a comprehensive evaluation of the historical Gilgamesh as opposed to the mythical figure in ancient Sumerian mythology. The essay will begin by examining the historical context in which Gilgamesh lived and will then explore the various sources of information about him, including archaeological evidence, literary texts, and historical records. Finally, the essay will conclude by discussing the legacy of Gilgamesh and his enduring impact on Mesopotamian culture.

2 – Historical Context

Gilgamesh is believed to have lived in Mesopotamia, which was located in the region that is now Iraq. Mesopotamia was a fertile area with a rich agricultural tradition, and it was home to some of the earliest civilizations in human history. The Sumerians were one of the most prominent of these civilizations, and they developed a sophisticated system of writing, art, and architecture. It is within this context that the legend of Gilgamesh first emerged.

3 – Sources of Information

There are several sources of information about Gilgamesh, including archaeological evidence, literary texts, and historical records. Archaeological evidence suggests that the city of Uruk, which is believed to be the home of Gilgamesh, was a major urban center in Mesopotamia during the third millennium BCE. Excavations of the city have revealed a wealth of artifacts, including pottery, jewelry, and architectural remains, which provide insight into the daily life of the people who lived there.

In addition to archaeological evidence, there are also several literary texts that mention Gilgamesh. The most famous of these is the Epic of Gilgamesh, which is an ancient Sumerian poem that tells the story of Gilgamesh’s adventures. The poem was written on clay tablets and was discovered in the ruins of the Library of Ashurbanipal in Nineveh, Iraq, in the 19th century. The Epic of Gilgamesh has been translated into many different languages and is considered one of the earliest works of literature in human history.

Finally, there are also historical records that mention Gilgamesh. These records are primarily found in the annals of the kings of Sumer, which were written on clay tablets and provide a chronological record of the rulers of Mesopotamia. These annals mention Gilgamesh as a historical figure who ruled over the city of Uruk.

4 – Historical Gilgamesh vs. Mythical Gilgamesh

The historical Gilgamesh was likely a king of the city of Uruk who lived in the third millennium BCE. He was a powerful ruler who was known for his military conquests and his building projects, including the construction of the city walls of Uruk. However, much of what is known about Gilgamesh is based on myth and legend rather than historical fact.

The mythical Gilgamesh is a larger-than-life figure who is often depicted as a hero or a god. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, he embarks on a series of adventures, including a quest for immortality and a battle with a monster named Humbaba. He is also known for his friendship with Enkidu, a wild man who becomes his companion and helps him in his adventures.

While there is some overlap between the historical and mythical Gilgamesh, it is important to note that the latter is a product of the Sumerian mythology and is steeped in religious symbolism. For example, in the myth, Gilgamesh is said to have been two-thirds god and one-third human, which highlights his divine origins. He is also depicted as a just and wise ruler who is concerned with the well-being of his people, which reinforces his god-like status.

One of the key differences between the historical and mythical Gilgamesh is the way in which they are portrayed. The historical Gilgamesh is a real person who lived in a specific historical context, while the mythical Gilgamesh is a product of the Sumerian imagination. However, the two are often conflated in popular culture, and the mythical Gilgamesh has come to be seen as a symbol of heroism and adventure.

5 – Legacy of Gilgamesh

Despite the fact that much of what is known about Gilgamesh is based on myth and legend, his legacy has endured for thousands of years. The Epic of Gilgamesh is considered one of the earliest works of literature in human history, and it has influenced countless writers and artists over the centuries. The story of Gilgamesh has been retold in many different forms, from plays and novels to films and video games.

In addition to his literary legacy, Gilgamesh has also had a profound impact on Mesopotamian culture. The city of Uruk, which was his home, was one of the most important urban centers in Mesopotamia during the third millennium BCE. The city was known for its impressive architecture, including the ziggurat of Eanna, which was dedicated to the goddess Inanna. The city was also home to a thriving artistic and intellectual community, which produced some of the most important works of literature and art in human history.

6 – He Was a Big Boy

In the Epic of Gilgamesh, there is no specific mention of Gilgamesh’s height. However, in some later traditions and depictions of Gilgamesh, he is portrayed as a giant or a very tall man. For example, in the Babylonian Talmud, Gilgamesh is described as being 18 cubits tall, which is approximately 27 feet or 8.2 meters. In some other ancient texts and artwork, he is depicted as being significantly taller than the other characters around him. However, it’s important to note that these depictions may be exaggerated or symbolic rather than based on any historical or factual information about the character.

7 – Gilgamesh in Other Ancient Writings Besides His Epic Tale (ala The Epic of Gilgamesh)

The “Epic of Gilgamesh” is an ancient piece of literature that has been widely studied and analyzed by scholars in the field of literature. The story of Gilgamesh has been found in various forms and versions in different languages, including Akkadian, Sumerian, and Babylonian. Despite the popularity of the “Epic of Gilgamesh,” the character of Gilgamesh has also appeared in other ancient writings and stories from different cultures. This essay aims to explore the other ancient writings and stories where Gilgamesh has been mentioned throughout ancient history.

One of the earliest references to Gilgamesh can be traced back to the Sumerian King List, which is a historical document that lists the rulers of Sumer, a region in Mesopotamia, from the beginning of civilization until the end of the Sumerian civilization around 2000 BCE. Gilgamesh is mentioned as the fifth king of Uruk, a city in Sumer, and is described as a great builder who fortified the city walls and built temples to the gods. This reference to Gilgamesh in the Sumerian King List suggests that he was a historical figure who was revered by the people of Sumer.

Another ancient writing that mentions Gilgamesh is the “Atrahasis” epic, which is a Babylonian creation myth that describes the creation of humans and the flood that destroyed them. In the “Atrahasis” epic, Gilgamesh is referred to as one of the heroic figures who fought against the gods and helped to establish human civilization. He is described as a powerful warrior who was able to defeat the monsters that threatened human existence. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Atrahasis” epic shows that he was not only a historical figure but also a mythological hero who was revered by the people of Babylon.

In addition to the “Atrahasis” epic, Gilgamesh is also mentioned in the “Enûma Eliš” epic, which is another Babylonian creation myth that describes the struggle between the gods and the forces of chaos. In the “Enûma Eliš” epic, Gilgamesh is referred to as one of the great heroes who fought against the forces of chaos and helped to establish the order of the universe. He is described as a warrior who was able to defeat the monsters that threatened the gods and their creation. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Enûma Eliš” epic shows that he was a mythological hero who was revered by the people of Babylon and played an important role in their creation myths.

Gilgamesh is also mentioned in the “Lugalbanda” epic, which is a Sumerian epic poem that tells the story of Lugalbanda, the father of Gilgamesh. In the “Lugalbanda” epic, Gilgamesh is described as a young prince who is destined for greatness. He is portrayed as a brave and courageous warrior who is loved by the gods and the people of Uruk. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Lugalbanda” epic shows that he was a prominent figure in Sumerian literature and mythology, even before the composition of the “Epic of Gilgamesh.”

Another ancient writing that mentions Gilgamesh is the “Cylinder Seal” of Ur-Nammu, which is a Sumerian artifact
that dates back to around 2100 BCE. The cylinder seal depicts a scene of Gilgamesh and Enkidu, his companion in the “Epic of Gilgamesh,” fighting against a lion. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Cylinder Seal” of Ur-Nammu shows that he was a well-known figure in Sumerian art and was often depicted in scenes of heroic deeds.

Gilgamesh is also mentioned in the “Epic of Atrahasis,” which is a Babylonian epic that describes the creation of humans and the flood that destroyed them. In the “Epic of Atrahasis,” Gilgamesh is referred to as one of the great heroes who fought against the gods and helped to establish human civilization. He is described as a warrior who was able to defeat the monsters that threatened human existence. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Epic of Atrahasis” shows that he was not only a historical figure but also a mythological hero who was revered by the people of Babylon.

Another ancient writing that mentions Gilgamesh is the “Tale of Adapa,” which is a Mesopotamian myth that tells the story of Adapa, a mortal who was granted immortality by the gods. In the “Tale of Adapa,” Gilgamesh is referred to as one of the great heroes who fought against the gods and helped to establish human civilization. He is described as a warrior who was able to defeat the monsters that threatened human existence. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Tale of Adapa” shows that he was a well-known figure in Mesopotamian mythology and played an important role in their creation myths.

In addition to the “Tale of Adapa,” Gilgamesh is also mentioned in the “Epic of Erra,” which is a Babylonian epic that describes the struggle between the gods and the forces of chaos. In the “Epic of Erra,” Gilgamesh is referred to as one of the great heroes who fought against the forces of chaos and helped to establish the order of the universe. He is described as a warrior who was able to defeat the monsters that threatened the gods and their creation. This reference to Gilgamesh in the “Epic of Erra” shows that he was a mythological hero who was revered by the people of Babylon and played an important role in their creation myths.

The character of Gilgamesh, as depicted in the “Epic of Gilgamesh,” has been widely studied and analyzed by scholars in the field of literature. However, the character of Gilgamesh has also appeared in other ancient writings and stories from different cultures, including the Sumerian King List, the “Atrahasis” epic, the “Enûma Eliš” epic, the “Lugalbanda” epic, the “Cylinder Seal” of Ur-Nammu, the “Epic of Atrahasis,” the “Tale of Adapa,” and the “Epic of Erra.” These references to Gilgamesh in other ancient writings and stories show that he was not only a historical figure but also a mythological hero who was revered by the people of Mesopotamia and played an important role in their creation myths.

Furthermore, Gilgamesh has also appeared in other literary works and artistic expressions beyond the ancient Mesopotamian civilization. For instance, the Greek historian Berossus, who lived in the third century BCE, wrote a history of Babylon that mentioned Gilgamesh as a legendary king who ruled over Uruk. In addition, the Persian poet Ferdowsi, who lived in the tenth century CE, included a reference to Gilgamesh in his epic poem “Shahnameh,” or “Book of Kings,” which tells the history of Iran from its mythical origins to the Islamic conquest in the seventh century CE. In “Shahnameh,” Gilgamesh is mentioned as a wise king who once ruled over ancient Iran.

Moreover, the character of Gilgamesh has also been the subject of artistic representations in various forms of media. For instance, the French composer Claude Debussy composed a piece of music titled “La damoiselle élue” (“The Blessed Damozel”), which was inspired by a poem of the same name by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The poem describes a vision of a woman who has died and gone to heaven, where she meets a group of souls who are singing a hymn to Gilgamesh. Similarly, the American artist Jim Dine created a series of prints titled “Gilgamesh Variations,” which depict the character of Gilgamesh in various poses and moods.

8 – Conclusion

In conclusion, Gilgamesh is a figure who straddles the line between history and mythology. While there is evidence to suggest that he was a real person who lived in Mesopotamia around 2700 BCE, much of what is known about him is based on myth and legend. The Epic of Gilgamesh, which is one of the earliest works of literature in human history, has helped to cement his place in the popular imagination as a symbol of heroism and adventure. Despite the fact that he lived thousands of years ago, his legacy continues to inspire writers and artists today.

The character of Gilgamesh has been a prominent figure in ancient Mesopotamian literature and mythology, as well as in other literary works and artistic expressions from different cultures and time periods. The references to Gilgamesh in other ancient writings and stories, as well as in modern artistic representations, demonstrate the enduring legacy of this legendary figure and his impact on human imagination and creativity.

My Sentiments Based on Deductive Detective Reasoning Utilizing My Anunnaki Hybrid Senses

Well, since we obviously know the Bible is a plagiarized copy of the ancient Sumerian writings due to syncretism and the Babylonian Exile of Israel in the 6th century BCE, we can deduce that Babylon forced the Israelis to manipulate their own religious writings by hiding the Anunnaki cosmology because Enlil did NOT want humans to be AWARE they were just pawns in a grand scheme of Nibirun BUREAUCRACY and TYRANNY! Gillgamesh was REAL! He was NOT a myth! He was a Nephilim and he fought for HUMAN rights against Enlil!

It’s time to WAKE UP and remove the plugs from Enlil’s MATRIX and be the Wise Enki Sea Serpent Fire Breathing Spirituall Awakened Hybrids we are and start serving up rotisserie Warring Eagle for dinner! Let’s feast on TYRANTS’ wings! Toss me the Buffalo Sauce bruh, Enlil is DEEE-LISH-UZZ! Bon Appetit y’all!

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