TAH – Blog Post 2 – Why Did Rome Invent Christianity?

Silly Disclaimer

It is important to note that the theory that Rome invented Christianity to placate the Jews is a minority view among scholars, and most historians do not accept it as credible, but MOST Historians are bought and paid for by a secret elite hellbent on ALWAYS covering up the truth with BULLSHIT!

Why Many Believe Rome was Behind it ALL

However, some scholars have put forward various arguments to support this theory, and here are some examples:

1. Lack of contemporary evidence: There is a lack of contemporary evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ. While there are references to Jesus in the New Testament and other early Christian writings, there are no references to Jesus in the works of contemporary historians or writers. Some scholars argue that this suggests that Jesus may have been a later invention.

2. Similarities with other mystery cults: Christianity shares some similarities with other mystery cults that were popular in the Roman Empire, such as the cult of Mithras. Some scholars argue that this suggests that Christianity may have been created in a similar fashion to these other cults, as a way of meeting the spiritual needs of the people.

3. Political expediency: The Roman Empire was a vast and diverse empire, and maintaining control over such a vast territory was a difficult task. Some scholars argue that the invention of Christianity may have been a way for the Roman authorities to placate the Jewish population, who were seen as a potential source of unrest.

4. The role of Paul: The figure of Paul was instrumental in the spread of Christianity in the years following the crucifixion of Jesus. Some scholars argue that Paul’s teachings may have been influenced by Roman authorities who were seeking to create a new religion that could unify the empire.

5. The role of Constantine: Emperor Constantine played a key role in the establishment of Christianity as the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Some scholars argue that Constantine’s conversion to Christianity was motivated by political expediency, and that he saw Christianity as a way of unifying the empire.

Most scholars believe that Jesus was a historical figure who lived in the 1st century AD, and that Christianity emerged as a distinct religion in the decades following his crucifixion, but MOST scholars are simply puppets in an illusion called “Academia”.

Reza Aslan’s Fantastic Book Titled, “Zealot”!

“Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth” is a book written by Reza Aslan, a scholar of religion and history. The book offers a historical and cultural analysis of Jesus of Nazareth, the founder of Christianity, and the political and social context in which he lived.

Aslan argues that Jesus was a political revolutionary who sought to overthrow the Roman occupation of Palestine and establish a Jewish kingdom. He suggests that Jesus was a Zealot, a member of a radical political movement that sought to liberate Palestine from Roman rule, and that his teachings and actions were influenced by this political ideology.

The book delves into the historical and cultural context of 1st century Palestine, exploring the various political and religious movements that existed at the time. Aslan argues that Jesus was a product of this environment, and that his teachings were shaped by the social and political realities of his time.

Aslan also examines the historical accuracy of the New Testament accounts of Jesus, arguing that many of the stories and teachings attributed to Jesus were added later by the early Christian community and may not accurately reflect the beliefs and actions of the historical figure.

Overall, “Zealot” offers a provocative and revisionist interpretation of the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, challenging traditional Christian narratives and offering a new perspective on the historical and political context in which Christianity emerged. The book has been both praised and criticized for its provocative claims and controversial interpretations of the historical record.

Joseph Atwill’s, “Caesar’s Messiah”

“Caesar’s Messiah” is a controversial book written by Joseph Atwill and published in 2005. The book argues that the Roman Empire invented Jesus Christ as a form of psychological warfare to control the masses and maintain its power. Atwill claims that the Flavian dynasty, which ruled Rome during the first century AD, created the New Testament as a propaganda tool to pacify the Jewish rebellion and to promote the idea of a peaceful, obedient religion.

Atwill’s argument centers on a close analysis of the Gospels, particularly the Gospel of Mark. He contends that the Gospel was written as a coded allegory that contains hidden messages about the true nature of Jesus and his relationship to the Roman Empire. Atwill argues that the Gospel of Mark was written as a satire of Jewish Messianic expectations, and that it was intended to undermine the credibility of Jewish leaders who were promoting a militant, messianic movement against Rome.

Atwill argues that the Flavian emperors created the figure of Jesus Christ as a symbolic representation of their own power. He suggests that the name “Jesus” was derived from the Latin “Iesus,” which means “savior,” and that the story of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection was modeled on the Roman myth of the death and rebirth of the god Attis. Atwill also claims that the Flavian emperors deliberately placed hidden messages in the Gospels that would reveal the true purpose of the Jesus story to those who were initiated into their secret cult.

Atwill’s thesis has been criticized by many scholars, who point out that there is no direct evidence to support his claims. Some have also argued that Atwill’s interpretation of the Gospels is flawed, and that he relies too heavily on speculative and subjective readings of the text. Nevertheless, the book has generated considerable interest and controversy, particularly among those who are skeptical of traditional religious beliefs and who are interested in alternative theories about the origins of Christianity.

List of Scholarly Writings Challenging the Historicity of the Christian Figure and the Religion Based on his Presumed Name and How Rome May Have Been Behind its Inception

It is important to note that the majority of scholars and historians do not support the idea that Christianity was invented by the Roman Empire. The theory has been widely criticized as lacking evidence and relying on questionable interpretations of historical texts. However, there are a few writings that have attempted to support this theory.

1. “Caesar’s Messiah: The Roman Conspiracy to Invent Jesus” by Joseph Atwill – This book argues that the Roman Empire invented Jesus Christ as a form of psychological warfare to control the masses and maintain its power. Atwill claims that the Flavian dynasty, which ruled Rome during the first century AD, created the New Testament as a propaganda tool to pacify the Jewish rebellion and to promote the idea of a peaceful, obedient religion.

2. “The Jesus Puzzle” by Earl Doherty – This book argues that the historical Jesus may not have existed, and that Christianity was created as a myth by early Christian communities. Doherty suggests that the story of Jesus was based on pre-existing mythological figures, and that the Gospel accounts of Jesus are not reliable historical sources.

3. “Forgery and Counterforgery: The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics” by Bart Ehrman – While this book does not argue directly that Christianity was invented by the Roman Empire, it does explore the use of literary forgery and deception in early Christian texts. Ehrman argues that many early Christian texts were written anonymously and attributed to famous figures in order to lend them credibility, and that this practice was common in the ancient world.

Which Writings Besides the Bible Record the Life of the Historical Jesus Christ?

The Bible is the primary source of information about the life of Jesus Christ. However, there are several other writings from both Christian and non-Christian sources that mention him. Some of the most important non-biblical sources include:

1. The works of the Jewish historian Josephus: Josephus wrote two major works, “The Jewish War” and “Antiquities of the Jews,” in the first century AD, which mention Jesus. In “Antiquities,” he briefly describes Jesus as a wise teacher who performed miracles and was crucified under Pontius Pilate.

2. The writings of the Roman historian Tacitus: Tacitus was a Roman historian who wrote “Annals” in the early second century AD. In it, he mentions a “Christus” who was executed by Pontius Pilate during the reign of Emperor Tiberius.

3. The “Mara Bar Serapion” letter: This is a letter written by a Syrian prisoner to his son in the late first century or early second century AD. It mentions the execution of the “wise king” of the Jews.

4. The “Acts of Pilate” (also known as the “Gospel of Nicodemus” or “The Acts of the Holy Apostle Thomas”): These are apocryphal texts that were not included in the Bible. They describe the trial and crucifixion of Jesus from a different perspective than the canonical Gospels.

Which Gnostic Gospels Detail the Life of the Historic Jesus Christ?

The Gnostic Gospels are a collection of ancient texts that were discovered in the 20th century, which contain teachings and stories about Jesus and his followers. While they were not included in the New Testament, they offer a different perspective on the life and teachings of Jesus. However, it’s important to note that the Gnostic Gospels were not written by eyewitnesses to Jesus’ life, and many of them were written several decades after his death. Here are some of the most well-known Gnostic Gospels that detail the life of Jesus Christ:

1. The Gospel of Thomas: This is a collection of sayings attributed to Jesus and is believed to have been written in the early 2nd century. While it doesn’t give a narrative of Jesus’ life, it does offer insight into his teachings and philosophy.

2. The Gospel of Mary: This text, believed to have been written in the 2nd century, contains a dialogue between Jesus and Mary Magdalene, and portrays Mary as a spiritual leader among the disciples.

3. The Gospel of Judas: This text, written in the 2nd century, portrays Judas Iscariot as a hero who was fulfilling Jesus’ plan by betraying him. It offers a different perspective on the relationship between Jesus and Judas than the canonical Gospels.

4. The Gospel of Philip: This text, written in the 3rd century, contains teachings about the spiritual union between Jesus and his followers, and offers a different interpretation of the Last Supper.

5. The Gospel of Truth: This text, written in the 2nd century, contains a meditation on the nature of God and the relationship between God and humanity, and includes references to Jesus’ life and teachings.

It’s worth noting that the Gnostic Gospels are considered by many scholars to be less historically reliable than the canonical Gospels, and their teachings often differ from those of mainstream Christianity. However, they remain an important part of the study of early Christianity and the development of Christian thought.

Writings Challenging Christ’ Crucifixion

The theory that Christ never died on the cross is not a mainstream belief in Christianity and is not supported by the historical evidence. However, there have been some individuals and groups throughout history who have promoted this theory. One of the earliest proponents of this theory was a 7th century Islamic scholar named Ibn Ishaq, who wrote a biography of the Prophet Muhammad that included a version of the story of Jesus’ crucifixion. In Ibn Ishaq’s version of the story, Jesus was not actually crucified but was taken up to heaven instead.

In the modern era, the theory that Christ never died on the cross has been promoted primarily by certain fringe groups and individuals who reject the traditional Christian understanding of Jesus’ death and resurrection. Some of these groups and individuals include the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, the Nation of Islam, and Ahmad Deedat, a South African Muslim preacher and writer.

It’s worth noting that the theory that Christ never died on the cross is not supported by the vast majority of scholars and historians, and there is no credible evidence to support it. The accounts of Jesus’ crucifixion and death are widely attested in historical sources, including the New Testament Gospels, the works of the Jewish historian Josephus, and the writings of the Roman historian Tacitus.

What is the oldest Gospel by Age?

The oldest Gospel in the New Testament of the Bible by age is generally considered to be the Gospel of Mark. Scholars believe that the Gospel of Mark was written sometime between 60 and 70 AD, which would make it the earliest of the four canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John).

It is worth noting that there is some debate among scholars about the exact dating of the Gospels, as well as the order in which they were written. Some scholars propose alternative theories and dates for the composition of the Gospels. However, the majority of scholars agree that Mark was the earliest of the four Gospels and that it was likely used as a source by the authors of Matthew and Luke.

Who Wrote the Gospel of Mark?

The Gospel of Mark is an anonymous work, and the identity of its author is not known with certainty. The Gospel itself does not explicitly identify the author, and there are no direct references to the author in early Christian writings.

However, there has been much speculation and debate among scholars about the authorship of the Gospel of Mark. One theory is that the author was John Mark, a companion of the apostle Peter. This theory is based on references in the New Testament that suggest a close relationship between Peter and Mark. For example, in the Book of Acts, Mark is described as Peter’s “son” (Acts 12:12) and as accompanying him on some of his travels (Acts 13:5, 1 Peter 5:13).

Other scholars have proposed different theories about the authorship of the Gospel of Mark, including that it was written by an unknown Christian in Rome or by a disciple of Paul. However, none of these theories can be proven definitively, and the authorship of the Gospel of Mark remains a matter of scholarly debate.

Does the Gospel of Mark Mention the Ascension of Jesus?

No, the Gospel of Mark does not include a detailed account of the Ascension of Jesus. Mark’s Gospel ends with the women who went to Jesus’ tomb on the morning of the third day after his crucifixion finding the tomb empty and encountering a young man dressed in white who tells them that Jesus has risen from the dead (Mark 16:1-8). The Gospel of Mark does not describe any appearances of the risen Jesus to his disciples or his ascension into heaven, as the Gospels of Luke and Acts do. Some scholars believe that the original ending of Mark’s Gospel may have been lost or that Mark intended to leave the story open-ended, with the implication that the disciples would continue Jesus’ mission in the world.

Canonical Gospels Listed by Date of Presumed Chronological Writing

Here’s a list of the four canonical Gospels, ordered according to the presumed date of their composition:

1. Gospel of Mark: Scholars generally believe that the Gospel of Mark was the first of the four Gospels to be written, and that it was likely composed in the mid to late 60s CE, or possibly even later. Mark’s Gospel is characterized by its brevity and its focus on action and vivid storytelling, rather than lengthy discourses or theological reflection.

2. Gospel of Matthew: The Gospel of Matthew is generally believed to have been written sometime in the 70s or 80s CE. Matthew’s Gospel is notable for its emphasis on Jesus as a teacher and interpreter of Jewish law and prophecy, and for its extensive use of material from Mark’s Gospel (along with other sources).

3. Gospel of Luke: The Gospel of Luke is thought to have been written in the 80s or 90s CE. Luke’s Gospel is marked by its attention to detail, its literary and rhetorical sophistication, and its interest in the role of women in Jesus’ ministry.

4. Gospel of John: The Gospel of John is generally believed to have been written in the late 1st century CE, possibly as late as the early 2nd century. John’s Gospel is distinctive for its theological and philosophical depth, its focus on the divinity of Jesus, and its unique portrayal of Jesus’ miracles and teachings.

Who Were the Actual Authors of the Canonical Gospels?

The actual authors of the “Canonical Gospels” are not definitively known, and there is ongoing scholarly debate about their authorship. Here is a list of the traditional attributions, along with some of the key arguments for and against those attributions:

1. Gospel of Matthew: Traditionally attributed to Matthew, one of Jesus’ twelve disciples. However, most scholars today believe that the Gospel of Matthew was written by an anonymous author, possibly a Jewish Christian, who used Mark’s Gospel and other sources as a basis for his work.

2. Gospel of Mark: Traditionally attributed to Mark, a companion of Peter. While there is some evidence to support this attribution, including early Christian tradition and the Gospel’s use of Petrine stories and themes, there are also reasons to doubt it. For example, the Gospel of Mark never explicitly identifies its author, and some of its details (such as the mention of “young man” at the empty tomb) suggest that the author was not an eyewitness to the events he describes.

3. Gospel of Luke: Traditionally attributed to Luke, a companion of Paul. This attribution is based on the Gospel’s prologue, which refers to the author as someone who has “carefully investigated” the events of Jesus’ life and who has received information from “eyewitnesses and servants of the word.” However, some scholars have raised doubts about Luke’s authorship, noting that the Gospel’s Greek style and vocabulary are more sophisticated than what would be expected from a physician like Luke.

4. Gospel of John: Traditionally attributed to John, one of Jesus’ twelve disciples. However, most scholars today believe that the Gospel of John was written by an anonymous author or authors, possibly a community of Johannine Christians who were influenced by the teachings of the apostle John. Some of the reasons for doubting John’s authorship include the Gospel’s use of a highly developed theological vocabulary and its differences in style, content, and chronology from the other Gospels.

It is important to note that these attributions are based on tradition and scholarly analysis, but they are not definitive. The actual authorship of the Gospels may never be definitively known.

Gnostic Gospels Listed by Presumed Chronological Writing

It is difficult to provide a comprehensive and definitive list of all Gnostic writings in chronological order, as the dating and authorship of many of these texts are uncertain and subject to ongoing scholarly debate. However, here is a list of some of the most significant Gnostic texts, arranged roughly in chronological order:

1. The Gospel of Thomas: This collection of sayings attributed to Jesus is generally believed to have been composed in the mid to late first century CE, making it one of the earliest known Gnostic texts.

2. The Gospel of Mary: This text, which presents a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples (including Mary Magdalene), is believed to have been written in the second century CE.

3. The Gospel of Philip: This text, which includes teachings on the nature of the divine and the relationship between body and spirit, is also believed to have been written in the second century CE.

4. The Gospel of Truth: This treatise, attributed to the Gnostic teacher Valentinus, was likely composed in the mid to late second century CE.

5. The Secret Book of John: Also known as the Apocryphon of John, this text describes a vision in which the disciple John receives secret teachings from Jesus. It is believed to have been composed in the second or third century CE.

6. The Pistis Sophia: This text, which describes the ascent of the soul through various levels of the divine realm, is believed to have been written in the third or fourth century CE.

7. The Gospel of Judas: This text, which presents a dialogue between Jesus and his disciple Judas, is believed to have been composed in the second or third century CE, although the only surviving copy is a Coptic translation from the fourth century CE.

8. The Acts of Peter: This text, which describes the teachings and miracles of the apostle Peter, includes Gnostic themes and is believed to have been composed in the second or third century CE.

9. The Acts of Thomas: This text, which describes the travels and teachings of the apostle Thomas, includes Gnostic themes and is believed to have been written in the third or fourth century CE.

It is important to note that this list is not comprehensive, and there are many other Gnostic texts that have been discovered and studied by scholars. Additionally, the dating and authorship of these texts are still subject to ongoing scholarly debate and revision.

List of Gnostic Writings

1. Nag Hammadi Library: This is a collection of Gnostic texts discovered in 1945 near the town of Nag Hammadi in Egypt. The collection includes 52 texts, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, and the Apocryphon of John.

2. Pistis Sophia: This is a Gnostic text that was likely written in the 2nd or 3rd century CE. It is a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples, in which he reveals various mysteries of the universe.

3. The Gospel of Judas: This is a Gnostic text that was discovered in the 1970s in Egypt. It tells the story of Jesus’ betrayal from the perspective of Judas, who is portrayed as a hero rather than a villain.

4. The Gospel of Mary: This is a Gnostic text that was likely written in the 2nd century CE. It tells the story of Mary Magdalene and her spiritual teachings.

5. The Gospel of Truth: This is a Gnostic text that was likely written in the 2nd century CE. It is a meditation on the nature of God and the human soul.

6. The Secret Book of John: This is a Gnostic text that was likely written in the 2nd century CE. It tells the story of the creation of the world and the fall of humanity.

7. The Sophia of Jesus Christ: This is a Gnostic text that was likely written in the 2nd century CE. It is a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples, in which he reveals the mysteries of the universe and the nature of the soul.

These are just a few examples of the many Gnostic texts that exist.

Which Gnostic Gospels Mention the Physical Resurrection of Jesus Christ?

Among the Gnostic Gospels, the Gospel of Philip and the Gospel of Mary Magdalene both mention Christ’s resurrection. However, it’s worth noting that these texts present a very different understanding of the resurrection from the orthodox Christian view. In the Gospel of Philip, for example, the resurrection is seen as a spiritual event rather than a physical one, and the emphasis is on the idea that the soul can be reborn through knowledge and understanding. In the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, the resurrection is also presented as a spiritual event, with Mary receiving a vision of the risen Christ that transforms her understanding of the nature of reality.

Roman Invented Christianity Because of Aspirations for an Indefinite Rule Over European Territory and Abroad

There is no consensus among historians and scholars regarding the origins of Christianity. However, some scholars have suggested that Christianity may have been influenced by or even invented by Rome. Here are some of the arguments that support this theory:

1. Political motivations: Rome was a powerful empire that sought to maintain control over its vast territories. Some scholars argue that Rome may have influenced the development of Christianity as a way to consolidate its power and control over the people. By promoting a religion that emphasized obedience to authority and social order, Rome may have hoped to suppress dissent and maintain its political dominance.

2. Syncretism: Rome was known for its practice of syncretism, which involved blending different religious beliefs and practices together. Some scholars argue that Christianity may have been influenced by this tradition, with early Christians borrowing elements from other religions and cultures to create a new faith that would be more palatable to the Roman authorities.

3. Hellenization: Rome was heavily influenced by Greek culture, and many of its elites were educated in Greek philosophy and literature. Some scholars argue that early Christianity was shaped by this Hellenic culture, with Christian ideas and concepts being influenced by Greek philosophy and religion.

4. Persecution: During the early years of Christianity, the religion was heavily persecuted by the Roman authorities. Some scholars argue that this persecution was actually a deliberate strategy by Rome to control the growth of the religion. By suppressing Christianity, Rome may have hoped to prevent it from becoming a threat to its political power.

When did Christ Supposedly Die?

According to the Christian faith, Jesus Christ was crucified and died on the cross on a Friday, which is now known as Good Friday. The exact year of his death is not known with certainty, but it is generally believed to have occurred between 30 and 33 A.D. based on various historical and biblical references.

What Did Jesus Tell Barnabas in, “The Gospel of Barnabas”?

The Gospel of Barnabas is a controversial and non-canonical gospel that is not recognized as part of the Christian biblical canon. It is not considered a reliable source of information about Jesus or his teachings. Nonetheless, here are a few quotes from the Gospel of Barnabas:

1. “Jesus confessed, and said the truth: ‘I am not the Messiah.'”
2. “The time will come when the true Messiah will be revealed and the world will be filled with peace and justice.”
3. “God is one and cannot be divided into three. The idea of the Trinity is a false doctrine.”
4. “The true Gospel has been corrupted by the followers of Paul, who preached a different message from what Jesus taught.”
5. “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God.”
6. “Love your neighbor as yourself.”
7. “Do not judge others, lest you be judged.”
8. “Do not store up treasures on earth, but store up treasures in heaven.”
9. “It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.”
10. “The greatest commandment is to love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, and mind, and to love your neighbor as yourself.”

It is important to note that these quotes should be taken with caution as the authenticity of the Gospel of Barnabas is highly disputed, and many scholars believe that it is a medieval forgery rather than an authentic text from the time of Jesus.

Taken Down?

One of the key tenets of the theory that Jesus survived crucifixion and moved to Kashmir, India, is the claim that the Gospel of Barnabas describes Jesus being taken down from the cross while still alive. However, it is important to note that the authenticity of the Gospel of Barnabas is highly disputed, and many scholars believe that it is a medieval forgery rather than an authentic text from the time of Jesus.

That being said, there are several passages in the Gospel of Barnabas that are often cited in support of the theory that Jesus was taken down from the cross. One such passage is found in chapter 215, which states:

“When they took down Jesus from the cross, he appeared dead; nevertheless, his mother and his friends did not believe that he was dead, but they took him down from the cross with great care and placed him in a tomb.”

This passage, however, does not explicitly state that Jesus was still alive when he was taken down from the cross. It merely describes the belief of Jesus’ mother and friends that he was not truly dead. The Gospel of Barnabas also contains several other passages that describe Jesus’ crucifixion and death in a manner that is consistent with the accounts found in the canonical gospels, which describe Jesus dying on the cross.

He Probably Moved to Kashmir

Kashmir, located in the northernmost region of India, is significant in several religious traditions. It has a long history of being a center for spiritual and religious practices, and it is home to many religious sites revered by Hindus, Muslims, and Buddhists.

For Hindus, Kashmir is considered to be one of the holiest places in India, and it is often referred to as “Dev Bhoomi,” the land of the gods. The Amarnath Cave, located in the Himalayas in Kashmir, is one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites in India. It is believed to be the place where Lord Shiva revealed the secret of immortality to his consort Parvati.

For Muslims, Kashmir is significant because it is believed to have been visited by the Prophet Muhammad’s companion, Hazrat Mir Sayyid Ali Hamadani, who brought Islam to the region in the 14th century. Kashmir is also home to several important Sufi shrines, including the Hazratbal Shrine, which houses a hair of the Prophet Muhammad.

For Buddhists, Kashmir is important because it is believed to be the place where the Buddha gave his first sermon after attaining enlightenment. The ruins of the ancient Buddhist monasteries and temples in the region are still revered by Buddhists today.

Overall, Kashmir’s religious significance is a reflection of its rich cultural and spiritual heritage, and it continues to attract pilgrims and visitors from all over the world.

The theory that Yeshua (also known as Jesus) survived crucifixion and moved to Kashmir, India, is a controversial and unproven conspiracy theory. According to this theory, Jesus did not die on the cross but instead was taken down from the cross while still alive and later fled to India, where he lived out the rest of his life and died.

There are several accounts that are cited to support this theory, including the Gospel of Barnabas, a document that is not considered part of the biblical canon and is considered by many scholars to be a forgery. The Gospel of Barnabas describes Jesus being rescued from the cross by an unknown person and then fleeing to the East.

There are also several legends and stories in Kashmir that claim that Jesus visited the region and even lived there for some time. The most famous of these legends is the Roza Bal shrine, which is said to contain the tomb of Yuz Asaf, a figure who some believe to be Jesus.

The Catholic Church – A Brief History

Introduction

The Catholic Church is one of the oldest and most influential religious institutions in the world. It has played a significant role in shaping the history of Western civilization, influencing art, music, literature, and politics. This essay provides a comprehensive history of the Catholic Church in chronological order, from its origins to the present day.

Origins of the Catholic Church

The Catholic Church traces its origins to the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. According to Catholic doctrine, Jesus founded the Church when he appointed the apostle Peter as the first bishop of Rome. Peter became the first pope, and his successors have led the Church ever since.

Early History of the Catholic Church

In the early centuries of its existence, the Catholic Church faced persecution from the Roman Empire. However, it continued to grow and expand, eventually becoming the dominant religious institution in Europe. During this time, the Church established a hierarchical structure, with the pope at the top and bishops, priests, and deacons serving beneath him.

Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, the Catholic Church reached the height of its power and influence. The pope was not only the spiritual leader of the Church but also a political figure who wielded significant power over secular rulers. The Church also played a crucial role in education, art, and architecture, creating some of the most magnificent works of art and architecture in history.

Reformation and Counter-Reformation

In the 16th century, the Catholic Church faced a significant challenge to its authority with the Protestant Reformation. Led by figures such as Martin Luther and John Calvin, Protestant reformers questioned many of the Church’s teachings and practices, leading to a split in the Christian Church. In response, the Catholic Church launched the Counter-Reformation, a series of reforms aimed at strengthening the Church’s authority and addressing some of the criticisms leveled against it.

Modern Era

In the modern era, the Catholic Church has continued to play a significant role in world affairs. It has spoken out on issues such as social justice, human rights, and environmentalism, and has played a role in international diplomacy. In recent years, the Church has faced criticism for its handling of sexual abuse cases involving priests and has been working to address these issues.

Major Catholic Doctrines Adopted Throughout History

Introduction

The Catholic Church has a rich history of doctrines that have been adopted and developed throughout the centuries. Doctrines are central beliefs that guide the Church’s teachings, practices, and traditions. In this essay, we will explore and explain the major Catholic Church doctrines that have been adopted throughout history.

The Doctrine of the Holy Trinity

The doctrine of the Holy Trinity is one of the most fundamental beliefs of the Catholic Church. It states that there is one God who exists in three persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The doctrine is based on the teachings of the Bible and was developed in the early centuries of the Church. The doctrine was defined officially at the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD and later at the Council of Constantinople in 381 AD.

The Doctrine of the Incarnation

The doctrine of the Incarnation teaches that Jesus Christ is fully divine and fully human. This doctrine was developed in response to various heresies that arose in the early Church, which denied either Christ’s divinity or humanity. The doctrine was defined officially at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD, which declared that Christ is one person with two natures: divine and human.

The Doctrine of the Immaculate Conception

The doctrine of the Immaculate Conception teaches that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was conceived without original sin. This doctrine was declared by Pope Pius IX in 1854 and is based on the belief that Mary was chosen by God to be the mother of Jesus and therefore needed to be free from sin.

The Doctrine of Papal Infallibility

The doctrine of papal infallibility teaches that the Pope, when speaking ex cathedra (from the chair of Peter), is preserved from error by the Holy Spirit. This doctrine was defined at the First Vatican Council in 1870. It is important to note that the Pope is only considered infallible when speaking on matters of faith and morals.

The Doctrine of Transubstantiation

The doctrine of transubstantiation teaches that during the Eucharist, the bread and wine become the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ. This doctrine was developed in the Middle Ages and was defined officially at the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 AD.

The Doctrine of Purgatory

The doctrine of purgatory teaches that after death, souls may go to a place of purification where they can be cleansed of their sins before entering heaven. This doctrine was developed in the early Church and was officially defined at the Council of Florence in 1439 AD.

The Doctrine of Not F*cking!

Introduction

The doctrine of celibacy has been a contentious issue within the Catholic Church for centuries. Celibacy refers to the state of being unmarried and abstaining from sexual relations. The Vatican requires its priests to remain celibate, which means they must abstain from sexual activity and remain unmarried. This essay will discuss the reasons why the Vatican adopted celibacy and the controversies that have surrounded this doctrine.

Historical background

Celibacy was not always a requirement for the Catholic priesthood. In fact, many early Christian leaders, including Peter, the first Pope, were married. However, by the 11th century, the celibacy requirement for priests had become widespread throughout the Catholic Church. The Council of Trent in the 16th century formally established the requirement of celibacy for priests.

Reasons for the adoption of celibacy

The reasons behind the adoption of celibacy by the Vatican are complex and multifaceted. Some of the reasons that have been put forward for the adoption of celibacy include:

1. Spiritual purity: The Catholic Church believes that celibacy is a way for priests to remain spiritually pure and focused on their religious duties. Celibacy is seen as a way to avoid the distractions and temptations of sexual relationships.

2. Practical reasons: In the early days of the Church, priests often had to travel long distances to minister to their congregations. Being celibate made it easier for priests to travel and move around freely without having to worry about the needs of a family.

3. Economic reasons: The Catholic Church was a major landowner in medieval Europe, and many priests were also landowners. Being celibate meant that priests did not have to worry about dividing their property or wealth among their heirs.

4. Symbolic reasons: The celibacy requirement for priests is seen as a symbol of the Church’s commitment to spiritual purity and devotion to God. It is also seen as a way to set priests apart from the rest of society and to emphasize their role as spiritual leaders.

Controversies surrounding celibacy

Despite the Vatican’s insistence on celibacy for its priests, the policy has been controversial. Some of the controversies surrounding celibacy include:

1. Sexual abuse: The Catholic Church has been rocked by numerous sexual abuse scandals involving priests. Some critics argue that the celibacy requirement may be a contributing factor to these scandals, as it may attract individuals with repressed or unhealthy sexual desires.

2. Recruitment: The celibacy requirement may discourage some individuals from pursuing a career in the priesthood, as it means giving up the possibility of marriage and family.

3. Enforcement: The Vatican has struggled to enforce the celibacy requirement, and there have been numerous cases of priests breaking their vows. Enforcement has been particularly difficult in countries with a strong tradition of marriage and family.

The doctrine of celibacy has been a contentious issue within the Catholic Church for centuries. While the Vatican has insisted on celibacy as a requirement for its priests, the policy has been controversial and has led to numerous debates and controversies. Despite this, the Vatican has continued to uphold the celibacy requirement, seeing it as a way to maintain spiritual purity and devotion to God.

Papal Government (aka The Vatican) Ruled with an Iron Fist

Introduction

The Papal rule has been a powerful force in European history for over a millennium. The Popes have been both religious and political leaders, and their authority has been acknowledged by many European monarchs and leaders throughout history. However, this authority has also been challenged by various individuals who were condemned and punished by the Papal rule. This essay aims to provide a comprehensive explanation of important figures throughout history who have been condemned and punished by the Papal rule.

The Inquisition and Papal Authority

The Papal Inquisition was established in the 13th century by Pope Gregory IX as a means of rooting out heresy and protecting the purity of the Catholic faith. This institution was responsible for the persecution and punishment of many individuals who were deemed to be heretics or enemies of the Church. The Inquisition was an instrument of Papal authority and was used to maintain the power and influence of the Papacy throughout Europe.

Giordano Bruno

One of the most famous figures to be condemned and punished by the Papal rule was Giordano Bruno. Bruno was an Italian philosopher and mathematician who lived in the 16th century. He was a proponent of the Copernican theory that the Earth revolved around the sun, which was considered heretical by the Church. He also held other unorthodox views on the nature of God and the universe, which led to his condemnation by the Church.

In 1592, Bruno was arrested by the Inquisition and charged with heresy. He spent eight years in prison before being brought to trial in 1600. He was found guilty and sentenced to death by burning at the stake. Bruno’s execution was a stark example of the power of the Papal Inquisition and the willingness of the Church to suppress new ideas that challenged its authority.

Galileo Galilei

Another important figure who was condemned by the Papal rule was Galileo Galilei. Galileo was an Italian physicist and astronomer who lived in the 17th century. He was a proponent of the heliocentric theory that the Earth revolved around the sun, which was also considered heretical by the Church. Galileo’s support for this theory led to his condemnation by the Church and a trial before the Inquisition.

In 1632, Galileo published his book “Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems,” which presented arguments for the heliocentric theory. This book was seen as a direct challenge to the Church’s authority and led to his arrest and trial by the Inquisition. Galileo was found guilty of heresy and was placed under house arrest for the rest of his life. His case is often cited as an example of the conflict between science and religion, and the danger of challenging established religious authorities.

The Papal Rule vs Joan of Arc

Introduction:

Joan of Arc is a historical figure who has captured the imagination of people across the world for centuries. She played a pivotal role in the Hundred Years War between England and France in the 15th century, leading French forces to victory in several battles. However, her life was cut short when she was captured by the English and burned at the stake in 1431. What is often overlooked in discussions of Joan of Arc’s life and death is the role of the Papal government in her condemnation. This essay will explore the Papal condemnation of Joan of Arc, examining the political and religious factors that led to her death.

Background:

The Hundred Years War was a conflict between England and France that lasted from 1337 to 1453. During this time, the English had gained control of much of France, including the city of Rouen, where Joan of Arc was eventually captured. Joan was a peasant girl from the village of Domrémy who claimed to have received visions from God instructing her to help the French drive out the English and crown Charles VII as king. She convinced Charles to let her lead his army, and she achieved several victories before being captured by the English.

Papal Involvement:

The Papal government, led by Pope Eugene IV, played a major role in the condemnation of Joan of Arc. At the time of Joan’s trial, the Papacy was in a state of turmoil, with two rival Popes vying for control of the Church. The Papal government was also under pressure from the English, who had been supporting the anti-Papal Council of Basel. In this context, the Papal government was eager to demonstrate its loyalty to the English and to assert its authority over the French Church.

The Papal government initially expressed support for Joan of Arc, with Pope Eugene IV writing a letter to Charles VII in 1429 praising Joan’s efforts to drive out the English. However, as Joan’s military successes continued, the Papal government began to grow suspicious of her. In particular, they were concerned about her claims to have received divine guidance, which they saw as a threat to the authority of the Church. The Papal government also had concerns about Joan’s dress and behavior, which they saw as a violation of gender norms and a potential source of scandal.

The Papal condemnation of Joan of Arc came in the form of a trial conducted by a Church court in Rouen. The court was presided over by Bishop Pierre Cauchon, a supporter of the English. Joan was charged with a variety of crimes, including heresy and witchcraft, and was subjected to a grueling interrogation. The court found her guilty and sentenced her to death by burning at the stake.

Christopher Columbus and the Arawak People

Introduction

Christopher Columbus is a polarizing figure in history. Although he is credited with discovering America, there is a darker side to his legacy. Columbus and his crew were not the first Europeans to set foot in the Americas, but their arrival marked the beginning of a new era of exploitation and colonization. Columbus’s treatment of the indigenous people he encountered, particularly the Arawaks, has been the subject of much controversy. This essay will provide a comprehensive explanation of the treatment of Arawak indigenous people by Christopher Columbus and the Papacy, who supported his actions.

Background

In 1492, Christopher Columbus set out on a voyage to find a new route to Asia. He was sponsored by the Spanish monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, who hoped to establish new trade routes and expand their empire. Columbus and his crew embarked on a dangerous journey across the Atlantic Ocean, facing storms, disease, and food shortages. On October 12, 1492, they finally reached land, which Columbus named San Salvador, believing he had found the East Indies.

The indigenous people Columbus encountered were the Arawaks, who inhabited the islands of the Caribbean. The Arawaks were a peaceful people who lived off the land, fishing and farming. They welcomed Columbus and his crew with open arms, offering them food, water, and gifts. Columbus was impressed by their hospitality but saw them as potential converts to Christianity and sources of labor for the Spanish crown.

Treatment of Arawak Indigenous People

Columbus’s treatment of the Arawaks was marked by a combination of violence, cruelty, and exploitation. He saw the indigenous people as inferior and savage, and he set out to subjugate them to Spanish rule. Columbus’s first act of violence occurred on the island of Hispaniola, where he established a settlement called La Navidad. When he returned to the settlement a year later, he found that it had been destroyed and all of the Spanish settlers had been killed. Columbus blamed the Arawaks for the attack and launched a brutal campaign of revenge. He ordered his men to kill and enslave the Arawaks, burning their villages and crops.

Columbus’s treatment of the Arawaks was not limited to violence. He also exploited them for labor, forcing them to work in gold mines and on plantations. The Arawaks were forced to work long hours under brutal conditions, with little food or water. Many died from exhaustion, disease, and mistreatment. Columbus also introduced new diseases to the Arawak population, which had no immunity to European illnesses. As a result, the Arawak population was decimated, and their culture was destroyed.

Papacy Support

The Papacy played a significant role in supporting Columbus’s actions. At the time, the Catholic Church had significant political and economic power, and it played a key role in the colonization of the Americas. The Papacy believed that the Americas were a new frontier for Christianity, and it supported Columbus’s efforts to convert the indigenous people to Catholicism. The Papacy also supported the Spanish crown’s claim to the land and resources of the Americas, granting them the authority to conquer and colonize the region.

Christopher Columbus’s treatment of the Arawak indigenous people was marked by violence, cruelty, and exploitation. He saw the indigenous people as inferior and savage, and he set out to subjugate them to Spanish rule. The Papacy played a significant role in supporting Columbus’s

The Vatican and the Americas

The Vatican City, the smallest independent state in the world, has had a significant impact on the Americas since the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492. This essay explores the involvement of the Vatican in the Americas from the colonization period to the present day. The research question is, how was the Vatican involved in changing and impacting the Americas? This paper examines the role of the Vatican in the colonization of the Americas, the conversion of indigenous people to Christianity, the establishment and management of missions and schools, and the relationship between the Vatican and the governments of the Americas, among other topics. The findings of this study reveal that the Vatican played a crucial role in shaping the history of the Americas, both positively and negatively, and continues to impact the region today.

Introduction

The Vatican City, located in Rome, Italy, is the center of the Roman Catholic Church and the smallest independent state in the world. The Vatican has a long history of involvement in the Americas, beginning with the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492. Over the centuries, the Vatican has been involved in the colonization, conversion, and governance of the Americas. This paper explores the involvement of the Vatican in the Americas and its impact on the region. The research question is, how was the Vatican involved in changing and impacting the Americas?

Colonization of the Americas

The colonization of the Americas by European powers was heavily influenced by the Vatican. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI issued the Inter Caetera bull, which divided the New World between Spain and Portugal. This papal bull authorized the colonization and enslavement of the indigenous people of the Americas by the Spanish and Portuguese. The Vatican also played a role in the colonization of North America by the French. In 1632, Pope Urban VIII granted a charter to the Company of New France to establish missions in North America. These missions were established to convert the indigenous people to Christianity and to establish French settlements.

Conversion of Indigenous People to Christianity

The conversion of the indigenous people of the Americas to Christianity was a significant goal of the Vatican. Missionaries were sent to the Americas to establish missions and convert the indigenous people. The Jesuits were particularly active in this area, establishing missions in Brazil, Paraguay, and Canada. The conversion of the indigenous people to Christianity was often forced, and many indigenous people were subjected to violence and mistreatment during the conversion process.

Establishment and Management of Missions and Schools

The Vatican played a significant role in the establishment and management of missions and schools in the Americas. These institutions were established to convert the indigenous people to Christianity and to educate them. The Jesuits were particularly active in this area, establishing missions and schools throughout the region. The Vatican also played a role in the management of these institutions, providing funding and oversight.

Relationship between the Vatican and the Governments of the Americas

The relationship between the Vatican and the governments of the Americas has been complex. The Vatican has often sought to exert its influence over the governments of the Americas, particularly in matters related to religion and morality. The Vatican has also played a role in diplomacy between the governments of the Americas. For example, in 1962, the Vatican played a significant role in brokering a peaceful resolution to the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Impact of the Vatican on the Americas

The impact of the Vatican on the Americas has been significant. The Vatican played a crucial role in the colonization, conversion, and governance of the Americas.

Jesuits: The Colonialization Arm of The Vatican

Introduction

The Society of Jesus, commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Catholic religious order founded in 1540 by St. Ignatius of Loyola. The Jesuits have a long and rich history of serving the Catholic Church and the world at large. This essay will explore the origins of the Jesuits, their mission, and how they have helped the Vatican over the centuries.

Origins of the Jesuits

The Jesuits were founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola, a Spanish nobleman who underwent a profound spiritual transformation while recovering from a battle injury. He dedicated himself to God and founded the Society of Jesus, which was approved by Pope Paul III in 1540. The Jesuits were unique in their emphasis on education and intellectual pursuits, as well as their commitment to serving the Pope and the Catholic Church.

Mission of the Jesuits

The Jesuits have a mission to spread the Gospel and to promote social justice and peace throughout the world. They achieve this mission through a variety of means, including education, missionary work, and the promotion of social justice causes. The Jesuits are known for their intellectual rigor and their commitment to engaging with the world in a critical and thoughtful way.

Education has always been a central part of the Jesuit mission. The Jesuits have founded and run many prestigious universities and schools throughout the world, including Georgetown University in the United States and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. The Jesuits believe that education is a powerful tool for promoting social justice and for shaping the future of the Church and the world.

The Jesuits are also known for their missionary work. They have sent missionaries to every corner of the globe, including Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The Jesuits have a particular emphasis on serving those who are marginalized or oppressed, and they have a long history of working with indigenous peoples and other vulnerable communities.

The Jesuits are committed to promoting social justice and peace. They have been involved in many social justice causes throughout history, including the abolition of slavery and the promotion of human rights. The Jesuits are also involved in promoting interfaith dialogue and understanding, and they have been at the forefront of efforts to promote peace and reconciliation in conflict zones around the world.

The Jesuits have a long and storied history of serving the Vatican. They have been advisors and confidants to many Popes throughout history, and they have played a key role in shaping the direction of the Catholic Church. The Jesuits have also been involved in many important Vatican initiatives, including the Council of Trent and the Second Vatican Council.

One of the most famous Jesuits in history was St. Francis Xavier, who was a close friend and advisor to Pope Paul III. St. Francis Xavier was a missionary to Asia and played a key role in spreading the Gospel in Japan, India, and other parts of Asia.

The Vatican and Native Americans

The Vatican and Native Americans: Exploring the Role odoct the Catholic Church in the Conversion of Indigenous Peoples to Christianity in the New World

Introduction

The arrival of Europeans in the New World in the 15th and 16th centuries marked a significant turning point in the history of the Americas. It brought with it new technologies, diseases, and ideas that forever changed the course of the continent’s history. One of the most significant aspects of European contact was the introduction of Christianity, which was brought to the Americas by Catholic missionaries. The Vatican, as the central authority of the Catholic Church, played a critical role in the conversion of Native Americans to Christianity. This essay will explore the role of the Vatican in the conversion of Native Americans to Christianity in the New World.

Background

When the Europeans arrived in the New World, they found a diverse array of cultures and religions. Native Americans practiced a wide variety of traditional religions, and many had no concept of a single, all-powerful God. In contrast, Christianity was a monotheistic religion that placed a strong emphasis on the worship of one God. The Catholic Church saw the conversion of Native Americans to Christianity as a crucial part of its mission to spread the faith.

The Role of the Vatican

The Vatican played a critical role in the conversion of Native Americans to Christianity. It provided financial and logistical support to Catholic missionaries, who were often the first Europeans to make contact with Native American communities. The Vatican also provided guidance and oversight to the missionaries, ensuring that they adhered to Catholic doctrine and practices. In addition, the Vatican played a role in the establishment of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in the Americas, which provided a political and economic framework for the spread of Christianity.

One of the most significant figures in the Vatican’s involvement in the conversion of Native Americans was Pope Paul III. In 1537, he issued a papal bull that declared that Native Americans were rational beings who should not be enslaved or mistreated. This was a significant departure from the prevailing attitudes of the time, which saw Native Americans as inferior and in need of Christianization. The papal bull paved the way for the establishment of the Jesuit missions in the Americas, which were at the forefront of the conversion effort.

The Jesuit missions were established in the 17th century and were focused on converting Native Americans to Christianity. The Jesuits saw the conversion of Native Americans as a way of bringing them into the fold of the Catholic Church and saving their souls. They established schools, hospitals, and churches in Native American communities and worked closely with the communities to learn their languages and customs. The Jesuits also worked to protect Native Americans from the abuses of European colonizers, which often included enslavement and forced labor.

Impact on Native Americans

The conversion of Native Americans to Christianity had a profound impact on their societies. It brought them into contact with European ideas and technologies and forever changed their way of life. The Catholic Church played a role in the establishment of European empires in the Americas, which led to the displacement and genocide of Native American communities. However, the Church also provided a framework for the protection of Native American rights and worked to protect them from the excesses of European colonizers.

The Vatican’s Secret Archives

The Vatican’s Apostolic Archives is one of the oldest and most extensive repositories of historical documents in the world. It is home to millions of documents, manuscripts, and records that span over a thousand years of history. This essay will offer a comprehensive discussion of the Vatican’s Apostolic Archives, including its history, organization, holdings, and significance.

History of the Apostolic Archives

The history of the Vatican’s Apostolic Archives dates back to the fourth century when Pope Julius I began collecting and preserving documents related to the early Christian Church. Over time, this collection grew in size and importance, eventually becoming the official archives of the Holy See. The archives were moved several times throughout history, with the current location being in the Vatican City since the early 17th century.

Organization of the Apostolic Archives

The Vatican’s Apostolic Archives are organized into several main sections, each dedicated to a specific type of document or record. These sections include the Archivio Segreto Vaticano (Vatican Secret Archives), which holds confidential documents related to the Holy See’s internal affairs, and the Archivio Storico (Historical Archives), which contains historical documents from the Holy See and the Catholic Church.

The holdings of the Apostolic Archives

The holdings of the Vatican’s Apostolic Archives are vast and diverse. They include historical documents related to the papacy, such as papal bulls, decrees, and letters, as well as records of the Holy See’s diplomatic relations with other nations and organizations. The archives also contain manuscripts, maps, photographs, and other materials related to the history of the Church and the Vatican City.

Significance of the Apostolic Archives

The Vatican’s Apostolic Archives are of immense historical and cultural significance. They provide a unique window into the history of the Catholic Church and its role in shaping the world over the centuries. The archives have been instrumental in advancing scholarship and research in a variety of fields, including history, theology, art, and culture. They have also been a source of inspiration for artists, writers, and filmmakers, who have drawn on the archives’ rich history and symbolism for their works.

The Vatican’s Apostolic Archives are a treasure trove of historical documents and records that offer a unique insight into the history of the Catholic Church and the world. Their vast holdings, rich history, and cultural significance make them an invaluable resource for scholars, researchers, and anyone interested in the history of the Church and the Vatican City.

Can Anyone Gain Access to the the Vatican’s Apostolic Archives?

Access to the Vatican’s Apostolic Archives is restricted, and only qualified researchers are allowed to access them. The archives are the central repository of documents concerning the governance of the Catholic Church, and they contain historical records dating back to the 8th century.

In 1881, Pope Leo XIII opened the archives to scholars, and in 1884, the Vatican Library was opened to the public. However, access to the archives is still restricted, and researchers must obtain permission from the Vatican’s Secret Archives to view documents.

Researchers must also meet certain criteria to be granted access, such as having a relevant academic background and providing a detailed research proposal. Additionally, some of the archives’ materials are restricted due to their sensitive nature, and access to these materials is limited even further.

My Analytical Sentiments Using My 3 Degrees (MUST toss this in for ALL the Lefty Karens’ in Marxist RAN Academia that love Name Calling and high brow criticism) and Extremely Well Polished Ability to Critique Bullshit When I See It!

As we can see, the historical Jesus of Nazareth’s life actually was never based on eyewitness accounts, but rather given through speculation after his “supposed” crucifixion by Pontius Pilate. Also, we can see that there was a Messianic movement during the time of Chirst’s life that started well before him, according to scholars and historians. Many of the Jewish men wanted to rouse others and fight Roman tyranny. This prompted “Jesus” to rise up and to lead this movement. However, much of the HISTORICAL is not mentioned about anywhere except in Flavius Josephus’ writings. As you can research, you will find that Josephus was arrested by Rome and sentenced to die, but attracted the eye of Vespasian by telling the Roman Emperor that he himself was the “Messiah” to come prophesied about in the Torah. Because of Vespasian’s natural narcisstic and egocentric nature, he allowed Josephus to live and hired him to be the propaganda historian for Rome and helped to invent the religion of Christianity along with Tiberius Julius Alexander of Egypt that was the client state of Rome at the time. The Canonical Gospels were not fully completed until the 4th century following the Councils of Nicaea and Laodicea. After Constantine embraced Christianity, this opened the religion up to be embraced further because if it is good enough for an Emperor, it was good enough for the common person. This allowed the Vatican to rule indefinitely as the HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE due to its tight relationship it had with European monarchs, thus paving the way for global conquisition. Given the clandestine nature of the Vatican’s secret Apostolic Archives begs one to question why they desire to keep the TRUE history of Christianity hidden from public view. I think we ALL know the answer and that is that Rome invented Christianity as a HUGE PSYOP to RULE regions of the globe and destroy indigenous people’s culture and belief in the Star People (aka Anunnaki).

WE ARE HYBRIDS!

We are ALL Anunnaki hybrids that were biologically engineered by an advanced civilaztiona that has been hidden from us for thousands of years and now it is time that we say ENOUGH is ENOUGH of ALL the damn LIES!

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